Title

Regulation of Actomyosin Ring Formation during Cytokinesis by Iqg1 and Phosphorylation

Presenter Information

Madeline Hines

Department

Chemistry

Major

Chemistry

Research Advisor

Shannon, Katie

Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract

Cytokinesis is the division of a cell into two daughter cells. Budding yeast is a useful model organism because, like higher eukaryotes, it requires an actomyosin ring. My research focuses on Iqg1, which is required for cytokinesis and is related to IQGAP proteins in human cells. Phosphorylation of Iqg1 has been shown to regulate the proper timing of assembly of the actomyosin ring. One aim of my project was to investigate the function of Iqg1 phosphorylation at specific amino acids in cytokinesis. The second goal was to determine the effect of phosphorylation on binding of Iqg1 to formin proteins, Bnr1 and Bni1. This research is important for the understanding the regulation of cytokinesis and how this process can be perturbed in cancer cells.

Biography

Madeline, Maddie, Hines is a graduating senior from the chemistry department. She has an emphasis in Biochemistry. She choose to work in Dr. Shannon’s research lab to gain biology lab skills which she hopes to use in the future for cancer research.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Award

Sciences poster session, First place

Location

Upper Atrium

Presentation Date

17 Apr 2018, 9:00 am - 12:00 pm

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Apr 17th, 9:00 AM Apr 17th, 12:00 PM

Regulation of Actomyosin Ring Formation during Cytokinesis by Iqg1 and Phosphorylation

Upper Atrium

Cytokinesis is the division of a cell into two daughter cells. Budding yeast is a useful model organism because, like higher eukaryotes, it requires an actomyosin ring. My research focuses on Iqg1, which is required for cytokinesis and is related to IQGAP proteins in human cells. Phosphorylation of Iqg1 has been shown to regulate the proper timing of assembly of the actomyosin ring. One aim of my project was to investigate the function of Iqg1 phosphorylation at specific amino acids in cytokinesis. The second goal was to determine the effect of phosphorylation on binding of Iqg1 to formin proteins, Bnr1 and Bni1. This research is important for the understanding the regulation of cytokinesis and how this process can be perturbed in cancer cells.