Title

In Vitro Study of the Effect of Nanoparticles on DNA deletion/mutations

Presenter Information

Julie Breckenridge

Department

Chemistry

Major

Chemistry (Emphasis in Biochemistry)

Research Advisor

Ma, Yinfa

Advisor's Department

Chemistry

Funding Source

UMR Opportunities for Undergraduate Research Experiences (OURE) Program

Abstract

Nanoparticles are widely used in a variety of industries ranging from beauty care products to videotape production, and their influence is increasing. Nanoparticles are easily inhaled into the lungs due to their extremely small size (less than 100 nm). Once inside the lungs, their influence is compounded due to their natural tendency to form large aggregates, which allows them to remain in the lungs for a longer period of time. Some preliminary data have demonstrated that these nanoparticles were cytotoxic. However, the mechanism for the toxicity is not yet clear. To study one possible cytotoxicity mechanism of nanoparticles, DNA was incubated with varying concentrations of three different sized nanoparticles, Fe2O3, CeO2, and Ti O2. The DNA fragments were separated by capillary gel electrophoresis to determine the amount of DNA deletion/mutations caused by each.

Biography

Julie Breckenridge is a senior undergraduate student at the University of Missouri--Rolla, majoring in Chemistry. She is the daughter of Mark and Mary Rose Breckenridge and is from Little Rock, AR.

Research Category

Natural Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Presentation Date

12 Apr 2006, 1:00 pm

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Apr 12th, 1:00 PM

In Vitro Study of the Effect of Nanoparticles on DNA deletion/mutations

Nanoparticles are widely used in a variety of industries ranging from beauty care products to videotape production, and their influence is increasing. Nanoparticles are easily inhaled into the lungs due to their extremely small size (less than 100 nm). Once inside the lungs, their influence is compounded due to their natural tendency to form large aggregates, which allows them to remain in the lungs for a longer period of time. Some preliminary data have demonstrated that these nanoparticles were cytotoxic. However, the mechanism for the toxicity is not yet clear. To study one possible cytotoxicity mechanism of nanoparticles, DNA was incubated with varying concentrations of three different sized nanoparticles, Fe2O3, CeO2, and Ti O2. The DNA fragments were separated by capillary gel electrophoresis to determine the amount of DNA deletion/mutations caused by each.