Title

Regulation of Actin Binding Proteins During Cytokinesis

Presenter Information

Scott Grier

Department

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Major

Civil Engineering

Research Advisor

Shannon, Katie

Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Funding Source

OURE

Abstract

Cytokinesis is the process of cell separation that occurs at the end of mitosis and meiosis. Dr. Shannon's lab uses the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model eukaryotic cell to study the coordination of cytokinesis with the end of chromosome segregation. This research focuses on the effect that mutations of the protein IQG1 have on actin binding during cytokinesis. Mutations that affect phosphorylation of IQG1 cause cytokinesis defects and change the timing of actin ring assembly. I have prepared yeast protein extracts and used immunoprecipitation to purify IQG1. I will perform actin binding and bundling assays to determine if the mutations affect the interaction of IQG1 with actin filaments. By conducting more research on IQG1 and the role it plays in cell division, we stand to gain a better understanding of how large of a role IQG1 has in cytokinesis.

Biography

Scott Grier is an undergraduate student dual majoring in Civil Engineering and Engineering Management at Missouri S&T. This is his first experience with biology research.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium

Presentation Date

17 Apr 2018, 9:00 am - 12:00 pm

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Apr 17th, 9:00 AM Apr 17th, 12:00 PM

Regulation of Actin Binding Proteins During Cytokinesis

Upper Atrium

Cytokinesis is the process of cell separation that occurs at the end of mitosis and meiosis. Dr. Shannon's lab uses the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model eukaryotic cell to study the coordination of cytokinesis with the end of chromosome segregation. This research focuses on the effect that mutations of the protein IQG1 have on actin binding during cytokinesis. Mutations that affect phosphorylation of IQG1 cause cytokinesis defects and change the timing of actin ring assembly. I have prepared yeast protein extracts and used immunoprecipitation to purify IQG1. I will perform actin binding and bundling assays to determine if the mutations affect the interaction of IQG1 with actin filaments. By conducting more research on IQG1 and the role it plays in cell division, we stand to gain a better understanding of how large of a role IQG1 has in cytokinesis.