Title

Hemolymph Extraction in Drosophila Melanogaster

Presenter Information

Sarah Buckley

Department

Biological Sciences

Major

Biological Sciences

Research Advisor

Thimgan, Matthew S.

Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Funding Source

UM Research Board, Missouri; Missouri S&T OURE

Abstract

Extraction of hemolymph from the fly is done by using a device composed of rubber tubbing, luer-locks, and pipet tips involving air pressure, as well. The air pressure guides the fly through the rubber tubbing and into the pipet tip, head first. The luer-locks are adjusted to apply the air pressure to only the pipet tip. One the fly is lodged into the end of the pipet tip, the antenna of the fly is removed and a little bit of air pressure is applied to push the hemolymph out of hole created by removing the antenna. This method will standardize the extraction of hemolymph by taking out the human factor of applying pressure and allowing air pressure to do the work. To record the amount of hemolymph extracted, the hemolymph drop gets transferred to hydrated paraffin oil. A picture is taken of the hemolymph drop in the oil and a volume calculation is performed.

Biography

Sarah is a junior from Richland, MO. She is studying Biological Sciences with an emphasis of Pre-Med and a minor in Chemistry. On campus, Sarah is a Student Ambassador for the Admissions office, the President of Scrubs Pre-Health Group, an Honors Academy student, and she is currently working in Dr. Thimgan’s Lab.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium

Presentation Date

17 Apr 2018, 9:00 am - 12:00 pm

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Apr 17th, 9:00 AM Apr 17th, 12:00 PM

Hemolymph Extraction in Drosophila Melanogaster

Upper Atrium

Extraction of hemolymph from the fly is done by using a device composed of rubber tubbing, luer-locks, and pipet tips involving air pressure, as well. The air pressure guides the fly through the rubber tubbing and into the pipet tip, head first. The luer-locks are adjusted to apply the air pressure to only the pipet tip. One the fly is lodged into the end of the pipet tip, the antenna of the fly is removed and a little bit of air pressure is applied to push the hemolymph out of hole created by removing the antenna. This method will standardize the extraction of hemolymph by taking out the human factor of applying pressure and allowing air pressure to do the work. To record the amount of hemolymph extracted, the hemolymph drop gets transferred to hydrated paraffin oil. A picture is taken of the hemolymph drop in the oil and a volume calculation is performed.