Location

New York, New York

Session Start Date

4-13-2004

Session End Date

4-17-2004

Abstract

The City of Grand Forks, North Dakota obtains drinking water from both the Red River and Red Lake River through a system of raw water intakes, shallow pipelines and pump stations. During flood events, the City often loses access to the system. In addition, the banks of the rivers are subject to land sliding, which can easily damage the shallow intakes. This proved particularly true during the record flood event in 1997, and resulted in the design of a new setback levee system by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. As a result, the City decided to construct a new gravity raw water intake system inland of the future levees. The design had to address the installation of pipe through soft and weak clay in a known landslide area to depths of up to 80 feet. Horizontal directional drilling (HDD) was chosen as the means of construction. Design issues associated with HDD included the potential for squeezing ground at the deepest sections of the alignment, the potential for hydraulic fracturing beneath the river bottom and at the exit points, river taps, penetrations though a large-diameter caisson pump station. Additional construction issues included bore accuracy and grade to handle design curves, control of squeezing ground at the caisson penetrations, and control of the bore annulus as a potential flow path for river water during construction.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fifth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-13-2004

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2004 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Directionally Drilled Raw Water Intakes, Grand Forks, North Dakota

New York, New York

The City of Grand Forks, North Dakota obtains drinking water from both the Red River and Red Lake River through a system of raw water intakes, shallow pipelines and pump stations. During flood events, the City often loses access to the system. In addition, the banks of the rivers are subject to land sliding, which can easily damage the shallow intakes. This proved particularly true during the record flood event in 1997, and resulted in the design of a new setback levee system by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. As a result, the City decided to construct a new gravity raw water intake system inland of the future levees. The design had to address the installation of pipe through soft and weak clay in a known landslide area to depths of up to 80 feet. Horizontal directional drilling (HDD) was chosen as the means of construction. Design issues associated with HDD included the potential for squeezing ground at the deepest sections of the alignment, the potential for hydraulic fracturing beneath the river bottom and at the exit points, river taps, penetrations though a large-diameter caisson pump station. Additional construction issues included bore accuracy and grade to handle design curves, control of squeezing ground at the caisson penetrations, and control of the bore annulus as a potential flow path for river water during construction.