Location

New York, New York

Session Start Date

4-13-2004

Session End Date

4-17-2004

Abstract

Over the past decade, liquefaction assessments have been performed for many existing and planned critical facilities at the Department of Energy’s Savannah River Site (SRS). The assessments incorporated site-specific Cyclic Resistance Ratio (CRR) and Ks with the use of the cone penetration test (CPT). The SRS-specific CRR and Ks were developed from laboratory testing of carefully collected samples. Test results show SRS soils have increased liquefaction resistance of two to three times when compared to standard literature for Holocene-age deposits. This increase in strength can be attributed to many factors such as aging and overconsolidation. The purpose of this paper is to discuss liquefaction methodologies used at the SRS. Specifically, 1) use of the CPT and correlations of CPT-derived results with that of high-quality undisturbed samples; 2) aging; and 3) Ks vertical confining stress factor.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fifth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-13-2004

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2004 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 13th, 12:00 AM Apr 17th, 12:00 AM

Liquefaction Evaluations at the Savannah River Site. A Case History

New York, New York

Over the past decade, liquefaction assessments have been performed for many existing and planned critical facilities at the Department of Energy’s Savannah River Site (SRS). The assessments incorporated site-specific Cyclic Resistance Ratio (CRR) and Ks with the use of the cone penetration test (CPT). The SRS-specific CRR and Ks were developed from laboratory testing of carefully collected samples. Test results show SRS soils have increased liquefaction resistance of two to three times when compared to standard literature for Holocene-age deposits. This increase in strength can be attributed to many factors such as aging and overconsolidation. The purpose of this paper is to discuss liquefaction methodologies used at the SRS. Specifically, 1) use of the CPT and correlations of CPT-derived results with that of high-quality undisturbed samples; 2) aging; and 3) Ks vertical confining stress factor.