Title

Thermal profile of varying depths of Ozark leaf litter

Presenter Information

Brittan McLaughlin

Department

Biological Sciences

Major

Biological Sciences

Research Advisor

Verble, Robin M.

Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Funding Source

Biological Sciences

Abstract

We examined the thermal environment of oak-hickory leaf litter at varying depths in the Mill Creek Watershed to better understand the regulation of the structure, diversity, and composition of soil surface-active arthropod communities. We predicted that deep leaf litter would result in cooler, more insulated soil surface temperatures then shallow leaf litter. Leaf litter depth was measured among 100 0.25 m2 quadrats, and we selected plots that represented the median, 10th and 90th percentiles of that range. iButton data loggers were placed on the soil surface of each plot, and left in place for five days, taking temperature recordings hourly on a 24-hour cycle. We plotted our data against ambient temperatures as recorded by an iButton data logger placed on bare soil. Data suggest that thermal environments differ among sites, but this relationship is likely influenced by other environmental factors.

Biography

Brittan McLaughlin is a Senior pursuing a B.S. in Biological Sciences at Missouri S&T. He has been involved in an Opportunity for Undergraduate Research Experience (OURE) project in psychology developing a yogic breathing device that will assist in treatment of pulmonological pathologies. He plans to attain a job perform prescribed burns as well as joining the woodland firefighters.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium

Presentation Date

16 Apr 2019, 9:00 am - 3:00 pm

Comments

Joint project with Justin Hinson and Lilly Germeroth

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Apr 16th, 9:00 AM Apr 16th, 3:00 PM

Thermal profile of varying depths of Ozark leaf litter

Upper Atrium

We examined the thermal environment of oak-hickory leaf litter at varying depths in the Mill Creek Watershed to better understand the regulation of the structure, diversity, and composition of soil surface-active arthropod communities. We predicted that deep leaf litter would result in cooler, more insulated soil surface temperatures then shallow leaf litter. Leaf litter depth was measured among 100 0.25 m2 quadrats, and we selected plots that represented the median, 10th and 90th percentiles of that range. iButton data loggers were placed on the soil surface of each plot, and left in place for five days, taking temperature recordings hourly on a 24-hour cycle. We plotted our data against ambient temperatures as recorded by an iButton data logger placed on bare soil. Data suggest that thermal environments differ among sites, but this relationship is likely influenced by other environmental factors.