Title

Angiogenic Effects of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Bioglass on Chick CAM Vasculature

Presenter Information

Daniel Park

Department

Biological Sciences

Major

Biology

Research Advisor

Semon, Julie A.

Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Funding Source

Seed Grant from Center for Biomedical Sciences and Engineering

Abstract

New blood vessels are generated through a physiological process called angiogenesis. Formation of these blood vessels comes primarily from pre-existing vasculature. Using a chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM), which provides a highly vascularized animal model, adipose- and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and borate-based 13-93B3 bioglass were tested for angiogenic properties. The mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and the borate bioglass were expected to accelerate angiogenesis within the CAM model. MSCs and bioglass were carefully placed between major blood vessels in the chick embryos seven days after their eggs were cracked. Angiogenesis was observed on a daily basis for three consecutive days before using a dissecting scope to capture images of vasculature in and around the plastic rings. Images were then analyzed and individual vasculature comparisons were made among: adipose derived-MSCs (AD-MSCs), bone marrow derived-MSCs (BM-MSCs), bioglass incorporated with AD-MSCs, and bioglass incorporated with BM-MSCs.

Biography

Daniel Park is a second bachelor’s degree student majoring in biology. After completing his economics degree at Emory University in 2013, Daniel decided to study a subject that catered more to his interests and career goals. While working in Dr. Julie Semon’s Regenerative Medicine Lab, Daniel has only become more enthusiastic about the biological sciences and the research being done in the field of stem cells.

Research Category

Research Proposals

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Award

Sciences poster session, First place

Location

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Presentation Date

11 Apr 2016, 9:00 am - 11:45 am

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Apr 11th, 9:00 AM Apr 11th, 11:45 AM

Angiogenic Effects of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Bioglass on Chick CAM Vasculature

Upper Atrium/Hallway

New blood vessels are generated through a physiological process called angiogenesis. Formation of these blood vessels comes primarily from pre-existing vasculature. Using a chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM), which provides a highly vascularized animal model, adipose- and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells and borate-based 13-93B3 bioglass were tested for angiogenic properties. The mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and the borate bioglass were expected to accelerate angiogenesis within the CAM model. MSCs and bioglass were carefully placed between major blood vessels in the chick embryos seven days after their eggs were cracked. Angiogenesis was observed on a daily basis for three consecutive days before using a dissecting scope to capture images of vasculature in and around the plastic rings. Images were then analyzed and individual vasculature comparisons were made among: adipose derived-MSCs (AD-MSCs), bone marrow derived-MSCs (BM-MSCs), bioglass incorporated with AD-MSCs, and bioglass incorporated with BM-MSCs.