Title

Sleep Responses to Starvation and Sleep Deprivation in Drosophila Melanogaster

Presenter Information

Shelby McNeil

Department

Mathematics and Statistics

Major

Applied Mathematics, Emphasis in Statistics

Research Advisor

Olbricht, Gayla R.
Thimgan, Matthew S.

Advisor's Department

Mathematics and Statistics

Second Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Abstract

Sleep deprivation and starvation both produce increased waking in Drosophila during the period of treatment, but both produced a different post-treatment response. After flies undergo sleep deprivation an increase in sleep is observed compared to sleep baseline. However, in flies that experience starvation conditions sleep tends to return to the pretreatment level. We will use mathematical modeling of sleep to determine any subtle differences in sleep patterns pre and post treatment. Males and females of three different genotypes will be used. These mutant genotypes include tim 01, cyc 01, which lack a circadian rhythm. The wild type, CS Skeath, will be used as a control. These flies will be placed in complete darkness for 48 hours and then are sleep deprived by either sleep deprivation or starvation for 12 hours. Post treatment sleep is measured for 48 hours, and analysis is done to detect differences from baseline.

Biography

Shelby McNeil is a senior in Applied Mathematics with an Emphasis in Statistics at Missouri University of Science and Technology. She is the Peer Involvement Advisor for Missouri S&T’s alternative spring break program, Miner Challenge. She has also been on the dance team for her four years in attendance. After graduation, Shelby plans on attending graduate school for Statistics.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hall

Presentation Date

15 Apr 2015, 9:00 am - 11:45 am

Comments

Joint project with Sahitya Injamuri

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 15th, 9:00 AM Apr 15th, 11:45 AM

Sleep Responses to Starvation and Sleep Deprivation in Drosophila Melanogaster

Upper Atrium/Hall

Sleep deprivation and starvation both produce increased waking in Drosophila during the period of treatment, but both produced a different post-treatment response. After flies undergo sleep deprivation an increase in sleep is observed compared to sleep baseline. However, in flies that experience starvation conditions sleep tends to return to the pretreatment level. We will use mathematical modeling of sleep to determine any subtle differences in sleep patterns pre and post treatment. Males and females of three different genotypes will be used. These mutant genotypes include tim 01, cyc 01, which lack a circadian rhythm. The wild type, CS Skeath, will be used as a control. These flies will be placed in complete darkness for 48 hours and then are sleep deprived by either sleep deprivation or starvation for 12 hours. Post treatment sleep is measured for 48 hours, and analysis is done to detect differences from baseline.