Title

Friction Stir Welding

Presenter Information

Mitchell Smith

Department

Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Science

Major

Nuclear Engineering

Research Advisor

Castano, Carlos H.

Advisor's Department

Nuclear Engineering and Radiation Science

Funding Source

OURE

Abstract

This project studies the effects of welding similar alloys together and comparing those welds to the original metals. Trial welds were made to understand the programming and mechanics of the friction-stir-weld machine. Welds were made on a single aluminum sample and then butt welds were created by welding two samples of aluminum together. For this project, one welding pin was used and the metal samples were kept to a thickness of 0.25 inches. The largest problem encountered was the separation of the metal samples when attempting a butt-joint weld. When the rotating bit was forced into the metal, the two pieces would separate if not clamped well enough. Welds were visually inspected to verify that they were properly made. Further tests, both destructive and non-destructive, are needed to quantify what is happening to the metal in the weld.

Biography

Mitchell Smith is a non-traditional student with a family of four. He graduated from Brownstown High School in Brownstown, Illinois in 2006. He previously studied automotive collision repair and refinishing at Lincoln College of Technology in Indianapolis, Indiana and graduated from there in 2007. He is in his second semester at MS&T after transferring from a community college in mid-central Illinois. He is earning a bachelor’s degree in nuclear engineering. After graduation, he plans to pursue a master’s degree in nuclear engineering with an emphasis on fluid flow and heat transfer.

Research Category

Engineering

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hall

Presentation Date

15 Apr 2015, 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

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Apr 15th, 1:00 PM Apr 15th, 3:00 PM

Friction Stir Welding

Upper Atrium/Hall

This project studies the effects of welding similar alloys together and comparing those welds to the original metals. Trial welds were made to understand the programming and mechanics of the friction-stir-weld machine. Welds were made on a single aluminum sample and then butt welds were created by welding two samples of aluminum together. For this project, one welding pin was used and the metal samples were kept to a thickness of 0.25 inches. The largest problem encountered was the separation of the metal samples when attempting a butt-joint weld. When the rotating bit was forced into the metal, the two pieces would separate if not clamped well enough. Welds were visually inspected to verify that they were properly made. Further tests, both destructive and non-destructive, are needed to quantify what is happening to the metal in the weld.