Title

The use of dynamic light scattering to follow the aggregation of bovine insulin

Presenter Information

Kirstin Bier

Department

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Major

Biochemical Engineering

Research Advisor

Forciniti, Daniel

Advisor's Department

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Abstract

Insulin forms fibrils rich in beta sheets at extreme pHs and temperatures. The fibrils may be identified by a couple of fluorescence assays and visualized by SEM. Dynamic light scattering is a powerful technique that can be used to monitor in situ the change in size over time of the fibrils. Moreover, information may be obtained about the size distribution and about the shape of the aggregates. In this work, human and bovine insulin were incubated at pH 1.8 in the presence of NaCl and at a temperature of 60 C. The samples were periodically monitored using a dynamic light scattering instrument working at 800 nm and at an angle of 155⁰. Deconvolution of the signals was done to identify the main populations and how they evolve over time. The results were compared with theoretical calculations. Differences between the insulins from both species are highlighted.

Biography

Kirstin Bier is a senior in biochemical engineering researching under Dr. Forciniti.

Research Category

Engineering

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hall

Presentation Date

15 Apr 2015, 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

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Apr 15th, 1:00 PM Apr 15th, 3:00 PM

The use of dynamic light scattering to follow the aggregation of bovine insulin

Upper Atrium/Hall

Insulin forms fibrils rich in beta sheets at extreme pHs and temperatures. The fibrils may be identified by a couple of fluorescence assays and visualized by SEM. Dynamic light scattering is a powerful technique that can be used to monitor in situ the change in size over time of the fibrils. Moreover, information may be obtained about the size distribution and about the shape of the aggregates. In this work, human and bovine insulin were incubated at pH 1.8 in the presence of NaCl and at a temperature of 60 C. The samples were periodically monitored using a dynamic light scattering instrument working at 800 nm and at an angle of 155⁰. Deconvolution of the signals was done to identify the main populations and how they evolve over time. The results were compared with theoretical calculations. Differences between the insulins from both species are highlighted.