Title

Putt for Show, Drive for Off-Course Dough?

Presenter Information

Arielle Bodine

Department

Economics

Major

Applied Mathematics and Economics

Research Advisor

Davis, Michael C.

Advisor's Department

Economics

Funding Source

Opportunities for Undergraduate Research Experiences

Abstract

A significant portion of a professional golfer’s income does not come from tournament purses. In a given year, a professional golfer may make millions of dollars in off-course earnings that include everything from endorsement deals to appearance fees. Though past research has monetized the value of skill sets to the golfer in relation to their on-course earnings, it is of interest to determine the effect of a certain skill level on a golfer’s off-course earnings. Thus, this study attempts to determine the effects of power, short game, putting, accuracy and scoring on a golfer’s off-course earnings. The results suggest that scoring most effects a player’s off-course earnings.

Biography

Arielle is an undergraduate at Missouri University of Science and Technology in applied mathematics and economics. In addition to her work on this OURE project, she is a member of Delta Omicron Lambda service sorority, historian of Kappa Mu Epsilon, a member of the Missouri S&T Honors Academy and a student writer in the S&T Marketing and Communications department.

Research Category

Social Sciences

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Award

Social Sciences oral presentation, Second place

Location

Meramec Room

Presentation Date

15 Apr 2015, 10:30 am - 11:00 am

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Apr 15th, 10:30 AM Apr 15th, 11:00 AM

Putt for Show, Drive for Off-Course Dough?

Meramec Room

A significant portion of a professional golfer’s income does not come from tournament purses. In a given year, a professional golfer may make millions of dollars in off-course earnings that include everything from endorsement deals to appearance fees. Though past research has monetized the value of skill sets to the golfer in relation to their on-course earnings, it is of interest to determine the effect of a certain skill level on a golfer’s off-course earnings. Thus, this study attempts to determine the effects of power, short game, putting, accuracy and scoring on a golfer’s off-course earnings. The results suggest that scoring most effects a player’s off-course earnings.