Title

If Rocks Could Talk, Oh What Tales Tekeze Could Tell

Presenter Information

Marissa Spencer

Department

Geosciences and Geological and Petroleum Engineering

Major

Geological Engineering

Research Advisor

Abdel Salam, Mohamed G.

Advisor's Department

Geosciences and Geological and Petroleum Engineering

Funding Source

Missouri S&T, NSF-OISE-IRES (National Science Foundation, Office of International Science and Engineering, International Research Opportunity for Students)

Abstract

As part of the International Research Experience for Students funded by the National Science Foundation’s Office of International Science and Engineering, students and researchers were given the opportunity to study rock outcrops within Tekeze Gorge, located in eastern Ethiopia. Tekeze Gorge is similar in size and geologic wonder to the Grand Canyon. The geologic history of the area of Tekeze Gorge can be reconstructed by combining field studies with the acquisition of data through remote sensing. The observation of small scale features within outcrops in the area including crenulation lineation, tensional gashes, and other metamorphic alteration were compared with enhanced remote sensing images on a regional scale. By applying principles of structural geology and the behavior of rock in rigid body shearing, interpretations were made of the evolution of the study area. Features within the metasedimentary rocks indicate tectonics in the Tekeze Gorge occurred regionally in two pulses. Folding in two directions implies a change in the direction of tectonic transport and may expose structures not previously discovered by other field methods.

Biography

Marissa is a senior at Missouri S&T studying Geology and Geophysics. Marissa is a member of the C.L. Dake Geological Society, AAPG- Chapter Representative, the Geological Society of America, the Eastern Missouri Paleonotological Society, as well as Sigma Gamma Epsilon, Earth Science Honor Society-Vice President. While studying the palynology of the Hell Creek Formation in Montana, Marissa also co-authored another scientific publication on the palynology of Southeast Missouri. Marissa is currently researching the palynology of Florida. In addition to classroom and research experience, Marissa has spent several summers in the field excavating dinosaur bones in Montana, leading geological tours of Onondaga and Cathedral Caves, as well as educational programs and geological presentations. Marissa is currently employed at the Missouri DNR, Division of Geological and Land Survey as a student intern. Marissa plans to continue her education at Missouri S&T as a student of geological science.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Award

Sciences poster session, Third place

Location

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Presentation Date

10 Apr 2012, 9:00 am - 11:45 am

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 10th, 9:00 AM Apr 10th, 11:45 AM

If Rocks Could Talk, Oh What Tales Tekeze Could Tell

Upper Atrium/Hallway

As part of the International Research Experience for Students funded by the National Science Foundation’s Office of International Science and Engineering, students and researchers were given the opportunity to study rock outcrops within Tekeze Gorge, located in eastern Ethiopia. Tekeze Gorge is similar in size and geologic wonder to the Grand Canyon. The geologic history of the area of Tekeze Gorge can be reconstructed by combining field studies with the acquisition of data through remote sensing. The observation of small scale features within outcrops in the area including crenulation lineation, tensional gashes, and other metamorphic alteration were compared with enhanced remote sensing images on a regional scale. By applying principles of structural geology and the behavior of rock in rigid body shearing, interpretations were made of the evolution of the study area. Features within the metasedimentary rocks indicate tectonics in the Tekeze Gorge occurred regionally in two pulses. Folding in two directions implies a change in the direction of tectonic transport and may expose structures not previously discovered by other field methods.