Title

Investigation of Mineral Weathering Products Following CO₂ Injection and High Pressure Tests

Presenter Information

Thomas Herbst

Department

Geosciences and Geological and Petroleum Engineering

Major

Geology and Geophysics/Applied Mathematics

Research Advisor

Wronkiewicz, David J.

Advisor's Department

Geosciences and Geological and Petroleum Engineering

Funding Source

U.S. Department of Energy

Abstract

Successful carbon sequestration is predominantly controlled by host rock minerals, their alteration products, and the rate of their formation following exposure to a CO2 injected environment with high pressure/temperature conditions. By reproducing these conditions in a lab setting utilizing mineral species originally tested in Goldich’s (1938) classic weathering series, it was concluded the minerals that reacted more rapidly, ergo were more susceptible to weathering, had a higher capacity for promoting carbonate mineral formation. A Hitachi S570 Scanning Electron Microscope was used in conjunction with X-Ray Microanalysis (EDS), to locate and identify newly precipitated mineral phases and their chemical composition. The most notable comparisons contrary to the Goldich series are the amphibole (hornblende) tests, which yielded faster reactions and greater alteration results than pyroxene (augite) samples. It was confirmed via SEM-EDS analysis that a concentrated region of white precipitate material contained microcrystalline particles with a rhombohedral morphology, called magnesite (MgCO3).

Biography

Thomas is a senior about to complete his studies and earn dual Bachelors of Science degrees in both Geology & Geophysics and Applied Mathematics. His background includes numerous awards and leadership positions within the Geological Sciences & Engineering Department, including the American Mineralogist Undergraduate Award, the Undergraduate Student Award for Service, and the Clifford Wade Bishop Scholarship “for Outstanding Senior in Geophysics,” as well as Presidency and Vice Presidency of the C.L. Dake Geological Society and Sigma Gamma Epsilon – The Earth Science Honor Society. Following graduation in May, 2012, he will attend graduate school.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Presentation Date

10 Apr 2012, 9:00 am - 11:45 am

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Apr 10th, 9:00 AM Apr 10th, 11:45 AM

Investigation of Mineral Weathering Products Following CO₂ Injection and High Pressure Tests

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Successful carbon sequestration is predominantly controlled by host rock minerals, their alteration products, and the rate of their formation following exposure to a CO2 injected environment with high pressure/temperature conditions. By reproducing these conditions in a lab setting utilizing mineral species originally tested in Goldich’s (1938) classic weathering series, it was concluded the minerals that reacted more rapidly, ergo were more susceptible to weathering, had a higher capacity for promoting carbonate mineral formation. A Hitachi S570 Scanning Electron Microscope was used in conjunction with X-Ray Microanalysis (EDS), to locate and identify newly precipitated mineral phases and their chemical composition. The most notable comparisons contrary to the Goldich series are the amphibole (hornblende) tests, which yielded faster reactions and greater alteration results than pyroxene (augite) samples. It was confirmed via SEM-EDS analysis that a concentrated region of white precipitate material contained microcrystalline particles with a rhombohedral morphology, called magnesite (MgCO3).