Title

Comparing the Diversity of Fungi on Leaves Submerged in Different Amounts of Stream Water

Presenter Information

Lara Applegate

Department

Biological Sciences

Major

Biology

Research Advisor

Niyogi, Dev

Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Funding Source

Missouri S&T Opportunities for Undergraduate Research Experiences (OURE) Program

Abstract

In this research project I looked at the different types of fungi that inhabit leaves placed in different parts of a stream. Four sites were compared along the same stream, one being completely submerged in the stream, one on the bank, and two further from the stream. The site chosen was the Audubon stream located on the north side of Rolla, Missouri. This site is considerably secluded and surrounded by native Missouri flora. Maple leaf cores were used in mesh leaf litterbags because maple trees are very common in the Midwest. The methods used in this study included dissolved oxygen measurements, conidia slides, PCR gels and most importantly DGGE gels. Although the results were slightly variable, I found that the leaves more submerged in water had a fungal community that was both more active and more diverse.

Biography

Lara is an undergraduate student majoring in biology. She is interested in the field of ecology and hopes to one day obtain a graduate degree in conservation biology.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Presentation Date

10 Apr 2012, 9:00 am - 11:45 am

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Apr 10th, 9:00 AM Apr 10th, 11:45 AM

Comparing the Diversity of Fungi on Leaves Submerged in Different Amounts of Stream Water

Upper Atrium/Hallway

In this research project I looked at the different types of fungi that inhabit leaves placed in different parts of a stream. Four sites were compared along the same stream, one being completely submerged in the stream, one on the bank, and two further from the stream. The site chosen was the Audubon stream located on the north side of Rolla, Missouri. This site is considerably secluded and surrounded by native Missouri flora. Maple leaf cores were used in mesh leaf litterbags because maple trees are very common in the Midwest. The methods used in this study included dissolved oxygen measurements, conidia slides, PCR gels and most importantly DGGE gels. Although the results were slightly variable, I found that the leaves more submerged in water had a fungal community that was both more active and more diverse.