Title

VHF dc-dc Conversion

Presenter Information

Justin Schlechte

Department

Electrical and Computer Engineering

Major

Electrical Engineering

Research Advisor

Kimball, Jonathan W.

Advisor's Department

Electrical and Computer Engineering

Funding Source

Missouri S&T Opportunities for Undergraduate Research Experiences (OURE) Program

Abstract

This poster covers a study into the possibility of a very high frequency power convertor designed to be controlled digitally by quickly switching smaller converters on and off. Attempts have made previously and as such, this research picks up where they left off while giving ample background. The topics of component selection and testing are all addressed alongside a discussion of the difficulty of populating boards with components smaller than 1 millimeter. An introduction to some issues that arose is included and possible experiments for the future are suggested.

Biography

Justin is a senior in the department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, working toward his B.S. in Electrical Engineering. He is involved on campus as an executive board member of Eta Kappa Nu (electrical engineering honor society) and with NRHH(residential hall leadership honor society)as both their Promotion Chair and Leadership Trip Chair. He enjoys playing guitar and solving logic puzzles and hopes to one day live in the mountains.

Research Category

Engineering

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Presentation Date

06 Apr 2011, 1:00 pm - 3:00 pm

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Apr 6th, 1:00 PM Apr 6th, 3:00 PM

VHF dc-dc Conversion

Upper Atrium/Hallway

This poster covers a study into the possibility of a very high frequency power convertor designed to be controlled digitally by quickly switching smaller converters on and off. Attempts have made previously and as such, this research picks up where they left off while giving ample background. The topics of component selection and testing are all addressed alongside a discussion of the difficulty of populating boards with components smaller than 1 millimeter. An introduction to some issues that arose is included and possible experiments for the future are suggested.