Title

The Killing Game: Copper, A Possible Bactericide for Contact Surfaces

Presenter Information

Michael Stockwell

Department

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Major

Aerospace Engineering

Research Advisor

Westenberg, David J.

Advisor's Department

Biological Sciences

Funding Source

Copper Development Association and Missouri S&T Department of Biological Sciences

Abstract

Antibiotic resistant bacteria are becoming more prevalent across the country. These infections are often spread by common contact surfaces such as door handles and push plates. Copper has been suggested to have antimicrobial properties and has been suggested as a replacement surface for stainless steel. In this study stainless steel, brass, and copper plates were tested for bacteria after a 24-hour exposure on the doors of school restrooms. In addition, a known quantity of E. coli and S. epidermidis were placed on each the different types of metal plates to determine the plates’ antimicrobial properties over time..Based on this study, the following conclusions can be drawn: 1) Both the copper and brass demonstrated antimicrobial properties in the field study on public school restrooms. The results were significant (p < .05) 2) Brass was comparable to copper in its antimicrobial effectiveness 3) Over 99% of the E. coli and S. epidermidis were killed on the copper and brass plates within 30 minutes in the laboratory controlled experiment.

Biography

Michael Stockwell is an Aerospace Engineering major that has been doing research and is minoring in the Biological sciences.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Presentation Date

08 Apr 2009, 9:00 am - 11:45 am

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Apr 8th, 9:00 AM Apr 8th, 11:45 AM

The Killing Game: Copper, A Possible Bactericide for Contact Surfaces

Upper Atrium/Hallway

Antibiotic resistant bacteria are becoming more prevalent across the country. These infections are often spread by common contact surfaces such as door handles and push plates. Copper has been suggested to have antimicrobial properties and has been suggested as a replacement surface for stainless steel. In this study stainless steel, brass, and copper plates were tested for bacteria after a 24-hour exposure on the doors of school restrooms. In addition, a known quantity of E. coli and S. epidermidis were placed on each the different types of metal plates to determine the plates’ antimicrobial properties over time..Based on this study, the following conclusions can be drawn: 1) Both the copper and brass demonstrated antimicrobial properties in the field study on public school restrooms. The results were significant (p < .05) 2) Brass was comparable to copper in its antimicrobial effectiveness 3) Over 99% of the E. coli and S. epidermidis were killed on the copper and brass plates within 30 minutes in the laboratory controlled experiment.