Title

Compressibility of viscoelastic fluid-filled membranes

Presenter Information

Wyatt Davenport

Department

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Major

Mechanical Engineering

Research Advisor

Wan, Kai-tak

Advisor's Department

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Funding Source

UMR Opportunities for Undergraduate Research Experiences (OURE) Program

Abstract

Many of the organic bodies in everyday life, such as embryos, cells, and even eyes, can be model as viscoelastic fluid-filled membranes. Throughout each of these bodies lifespan, their daily functions include a plethora of mechanical activities like adhesion to other bodies or resistance to puncture. Because of this, it is desirable to have the mechanical properties or to be able to quantify the properties of these vessels for the use in mathematical models. This research will rid these mathematical models of some poor assumptions, and also help in the technique in collecting properties of these membranes.

Biography

Wyatt is a senior attending the University of Missouri--Rolla majoring in Mechanical Engineering. He is the son of Dale and Tammy Davenport and is from Chillicothe, Missouri. Wyatt is also a member of Pi Tau Sigma and tutors for the Thermofluid Mechanics class weekly. After graduate school, Wyatt plans on pursuing a career in control systems/engineering design.

Research Category

Engineering

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Presentation Date

12 Apr 2006, 9:00 am

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Apr 12th, 9:00 AM

Compressibility of viscoelastic fluid-filled membranes

Many of the organic bodies in everyday life, such as embryos, cells, and even eyes, can be model as viscoelastic fluid-filled membranes. Throughout each of these bodies lifespan, their daily functions include a plethora of mechanical activities like adhesion to other bodies or resistance to puncture. Because of this, it is desirable to have the mechanical properties or to be able to quantify the properties of these vessels for the use in mathematical models. This research will rid these mathematical models of some poor assumptions, and also help in the technique in collecting properties of these membranes.