Location

San Diego, California

Session Start Date

5-24-2010

Session End Date

5-29-2010

Abstract

A comparison is conducted between clean sand liquefaction charts based, respectively, on normalized point penetration resistance in CPT static cone tests (qc1N) and shear wave velocity (Vs1). Examination of the shape of these field-calibrated curves, review of the factors influencing liquefaction resistance in the laboratory, field correlations between qc1N and Vs1, and field and laboratory evidence related to some of the factors influencing cone penetration resistance and shear wave velocity in sands, are all used in the discussion. It is concluded that the difference between the shapes of the two charts at the high end may be due - at least partially - to lateral stress effects associated with overconsolidation and preshaking, which are known to increase liquefaction resistance, and specifically to the higher sensitivity of the penetration resistance to the value of the coefficient of lateral stress at rest, K0.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Fifth Conference

Publisher

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Publication Date

5-24-2010

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2010 Missouri University of Science and Technology, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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May 24th, 12:00 AM May 29th, 12:00 AM

Comparison Between Clean Sand Liquefaction Charts Based on Penetration Resistance and Shear Wave Velocity

San Diego, California

A comparison is conducted between clean sand liquefaction charts based, respectively, on normalized point penetration resistance in CPT static cone tests (qc1N) and shear wave velocity (Vs1). Examination of the shape of these field-calibrated curves, review of the factors influencing liquefaction resistance in the laboratory, field correlations between qc1N and Vs1, and field and laboratory evidence related to some of the factors influencing cone penetration resistance and shear wave velocity in sands, are all used in the discussion. It is concluded that the difference between the shapes of the two charts at the high end may be due - at least partially - to lateral stress effects associated with overconsolidation and preshaking, which are known to increase liquefaction resistance, and specifically to the higher sensitivity of the penetration resistance to the value of the coefficient of lateral stress at rest, K0.