Location

San Diego, California

Session Start Date

5-24-2010

Session End Date

5-29-2010

Abstract

The San Diego County Water Authority (Water Authority) is undertaking a raise of the existing San Vicente Dam to provide both emergency and carryover storage to increase local reservoir supplies in San Diego County, California, USA. The emergency storage is required in case of a disruption to the imported water transmission system from floods or earthquakes and the carry-over storage would be utilized to store water during “wet” seasons to carry-over to seasons of drought. The existing San Vicente Dam is a 220 foot (67 m) high concrete gravity dam completed in 1943 with 90,063 acre-feet of storage. The raised San Vicente Dam will be about 337 feet (102.3 m) high, creating an approximately 247,000 acre-foot reservoir. The dam raise will be constructed using the roller compacted concrete (RCC) method. This paper presents details of the seismic hazard evaluation that formed the basis for development of strong ground motions that were considered in final design of the dam raise. The dam is under the jurisdiction of the California Department of Water Resources, Division of Safety of Dams (DSOD) which requires the use of deterministic ground motions for design. However, the earthquake ground motions at the site are largely controlled by background (or random) earthquakes, which cannot be adequately addressed using deterministic methods alone. This prompted the development of supplemental seismic design ground motions based on a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA). The PSHA was performed incorporating the latest information on seismic sources and recently developed Next Generation of Attenuation (NGA) relationships. Based on the results of the PSHA, ground motion parameters (response spectra and time histories) were developed for final design of the dam raise. Comparisons of the deterministic and probabilistic ground motions are provided. Application of the NGA relationships resulted in lower estimates of peak ground accelerations than what were obtained based on the previous attenuation relationships due to the use of the site-specific shear wave velocities of the foundation materials.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Fifth Conference

Publisher

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Publication Date

5-24-2010

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2010 Missouri University of Science and Technology, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

Share

COinS
 
May 24th, 12:00 AM May 29th, 12:00 AM

Seismic Hazard Evaluation for Design of San Vicente Dam Raise

San Diego, California

The San Diego County Water Authority (Water Authority) is undertaking a raise of the existing San Vicente Dam to provide both emergency and carryover storage to increase local reservoir supplies in San Diego County, California, USA. The emergency storage is required in case of a disruption to the imported water transmission system from floods or earthquakes and the carry-over storage would be utilized to store water during “wet” seasons to carry-over to seasons of drought. The existing San Vicente Dam is a 220 foot (67 m) high concrete gravity dam completed in 1943 with 90,063 acre-feet of storage. The raised San Vicente Dam will be about 337 feet (102.3 m) high, creating an approximately 247,000 acre-foot reservoir. The dam raise will be constructed using the roller compacted concrete (RCC) method. This paper presents details of the seismic hazard evaluation that formed the basis for development of strong ground motions that were considered in final design of the dam raise. The dam is under the jurisdiction of the California Department of Water Resources, Division of Safety of Dams (DSOD) which requires the use of deterministic ground motions for design. However, the earthquake ground motions at the site are largely controlled by background (or random) earthquakes, which cannot be adequately addressed using deterministic methods alone. This prompted the development of supplemental seismic design ground motions based on a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA). The PSHA was performed incorporating the latest information on seismic sources and recently developed Next Generation of Attenuation (NGA) relationships. Based on the results of the PSHA, ground motion parameters (response spectra and time histories) were developed for final design of the dam raise. Comparisons of the deterministic and probabilistic ground motions are provided. Application of the NGA relationships resulted in lower estimates of peak ground accelerations than what were obtained based on the previous attenuation relationships due to the use of the site-specific shear wave velocities of the foundation materials.