Location

San Diego, California

Session Start Date

5-24-2010

Session End Date

5-29-2010

Abstract

Case histories of widespread liquefaction and lateral spread induced by the Mw 8.0, 2007 Pisco, Peru earthquake and observed during a post-earthquake GEER reconnaissance are presented. A long duration of the earthquake over 200 seconds and two phases of strong ground motion induced widespread liquefaction and lateral spread of sand coastal deposits and road embankments over a total length of approximately 100 km of coastal region. Six case histories of liquefaction are presented and discussed including a massive lateral spread of a marine terrace believed to be as large or even larger than that reported along the Shinano River during the 1964 Niigata earthquake in Japan.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Fifth Conference

Publisher

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Publication Date

5-24-2010

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2010 Missouri University of Science and Technology, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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May 24th, 12:00 AM May 29th, 12:00 AM

Case Histories of Widespread Liquefaction and Lateral Spread Induced by the 2007 Pisco, Peru Earthquake

San Diego, California

Case histories of widespread liquefaction and lateral spread induced by the Mw 8.0, 2007 Pisco, Peru earthquake and observed during a post-earthquake GEER reconnaissance are presented. A long duration of the earthquake over 200 seconds and two phases of strong ground motion induced widespread liquefaction and lateral spread of sand coastal deposits and road embankments over a total length of approximately 100 km of coastal region. Six case histories of liquefaction are presented and discussed including a massive lateral spread of a marine terrace believed to be as large or even larger than that reported along the Shinano River during the 1964 Niigata earthquake in Japan.