Location

San Diego, California

Session Start Date

5-24-2010

Session End Date

5-29-2010

Abstract

A geotechnical experimentation site is being developed near Georgetown, South Carolina, to study the effect of soil age on liquefaction resistance. The site is located in an area called Hobcaw Barony on a 200,000-year-old beach to barrier-island sand deposit. Initial investigations conducted at the site include seismic cone penetration tests with pore pressure measurements, standard penetration tests with energy measurements, seismic crosshole tests, dilatometer testing, and fixed-piston sampling. Shear-wave velocities calculated from seismic cone test results are based on the true-interval method. The near-surface sand deposit extends from the ground surface to a depth of 8.5 m. The groundwater table is located at a depth of 2.4 m. Measured shear-wave velocities from the near-surface sand deposit are, on average, 47% higher than velocities of 10 year-old sand deposits with similar penetration resistances. The sand deposit at the Hobcaw Barony site is found to be susceptible to liquefaction, but ground shaking levels during the 1886 Charleston earthquake were not sufficient to cause liquefaction. This finding supports the observation that no surface manifestations of liquefaction occurred in the area.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Fifth Conference

Publisher

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Publication Date

5-24-2010

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2010 Missouri University of Science and Technology, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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May 24th, 12:00 AM May 29th, 12:00 AM

Estimating Liquefaction Potential if a 200,000-Year Old Sand Deposit Near Georgetown, South Carolina

San Diego, California

A geotechnical experimentation site is being developed near Georgetown, South Carolina, to study the effect of soil age on liquefaction resistance. The site is located in an area called Hobcaw Barony on a 200,000-year-old beach to barrier-island sand deposit. Initial investigations conducted at the site include seismic cone penetration tests with pore pressure measurements, standard penetration tests with energy measurements, seismic crosshole tests, dilatometer testing, and fixed-piston sampling. Shear-wave velocities calculated from seismic cone test results are based on the true-interval method. The near-surface sand deposit extends from the ground surface to a depth of 8.5 m. The groundwater table is located at a depth of 2.4 m. Measured shear-wave velocities from the near-surface sand deposit are, on average, 47% higher than velocities of 10 year-old sand deposits with similar penetration resistances. The sand deposit at the Hobcaw Barony site is found to be susceptible to liquefaction, but ground shaking levels during the 1886 Charleston earthquake were not sufficient to cause liquefaction. This finding supports the observation that no surface manifestations of liquefaction occurred in the area.