Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

4-2-1995

Session End Date

4-7-1995

Abstract

The January 17, 1994, Northridge Earthquake severely shook the Van Norman Complex, in the northern San Fernando Valley. Located in the nearfield, over the vicinity of the ruptured fault, the Van Norman Complex was subjected to many types of ground movements, including strong ground motions, tectonic displacements, ground deformation of natural soil deposits, and deformation of embankments and other engineered fills. The complex provides a well-documented case of how these various types of ground movements interact and their effects on engineered facilities. Throughout the complex, sand boils, liquefaction induced lateral spreading, and ground cracks were observed. Eleven water retaining embankments, including the Los Angeles Reservoir, underwent measurable movement. One small dike failed at the San Fernando Tailrace Channel at the northern end of the site. A great number of large diameter pipes and channels broke throughout the complex.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Third Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-2-1995

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1995 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 2nd, 12:00 AM Apr 7th, 12:00 AM

Northridge Earthquake — Van Norman Complex Ground Movement

St. Louis, Missouri

The January 17, 1994, Northridge Earthquake severely shook the Van Norman Complex, in the northern San Fernando Valley. Located in the nearfield, over the vicinity of the ruptured fault, the Van Norman Complex was subjected to many types of ground movements, including strong ground motions, tectonic displacements, ground deformation of natural soil deposits, and deformation of embankments and other engineered fills. The complex provides a well-documented case of how these various types of ground movements interact and their effects on engineered facilities. Throughout the complex, sand boils, liquefaction induced lateral spreading, and ground cracks were observed. Eleven water retaining embankments, including the Los Angeles Reservoir, underwent measurable movement. One small dike failed at the San Fernando Tailrace Channel at the northern end of the site. A great number of large diameter pipes and channels broke throughout the complex.