Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

4-2-1995

Session End Date

4-7-1995

Abstract

In spite of relative low, magnitude comparing with the historical destructive earthquake of the region, South-East Sicily was damaged by the 13/12/1990 earthquake, with estimated magnitude of 5.4; in the town of Augusta and Lentini even concrete buildings had severely damaged. The present paper deals with results from analytical soil amplification studies using actual soil profiles from Augusta site. To investigate dynamic soil behavior, field test as cross-hole and down hole were performed, and laboratory test as resonant column and cyclic triaxal tests were executed. Results indicate that, when using proper laboratory and field measurements of soil properties, one-dimensional soil amplification analyses can explain not only the trends observed in the intensity and distribution of damage to buildings but can explain the soil response, causing the severe damage of various structures in Augusta.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Third Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-2-1995

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1995 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 2nd, 12:00 AM Apr 7th, 12:00 AM

Soil-Response Analyses for the 1990 South-East Sicily Earthquake

St. Louis, Missouri

In spite of relative low, magnitude comparing with the historical destructive earthquake of the region, South-East Sicily was damaged by the 13/12/1990 earthquake, with estimated magnitude of 5.4; in the town of Augusta and Lentini even concrete buildings had severely damaged. The present paper deals with results from analytical soil amplification studies using actual soil profiles from Augusta site. To investigate dynamic soil behavior, field test as cross-hole and down hole were performed, and laboratory test as resonant column and cyclic triaxal tests were executed. Results indicate that, when using proper laboratory and field measurements of soil properties, one-dimensional soil amplification analyses can explain not only the trends observed in the intensity and distribution of damage to buildings but can explain the soil response, causing the severe damage of various structures in Augusta.