Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

4-2-1995

Session End Date

4-7-1995

Abstract

This paper presents observations from field studies and physical model tests to investigate the response of soil deposits to strike-slip bedrock faulting. The study is relevant to developing mitigation technique against fault-induced damage in structures located near potentially active faults. Observations of ground rupture patterns in alluvial materials following the 1992 Landers earthquake are presented. Particularly important are the observations of significant deformation away from the main trace, the width of the shear zone, and the effects of the surficial geology on the fault expression. Preliminary results from small-scale model tests simulating strike-slip rupture are also presented. The tests results confirm that the width of the shear zone depends primarily on the ductility and height of the soil deposit. These studies provide insight regarding ground deformation patterns in the soil overlying strike-slip faulting.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Third Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-2-1995

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1995 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 2nd, 12:00 AM Apr 7th, 12:00 AM

Observed Surface Breakage due to Strike-Slip Faulting

St. Louis, Missouri

This paper presents observations from field studies and physical model tests to investigate the response of soil deposits to strike-slip bedrock faulting. The study is relevant to developing mitigation technique against fault-induced damage in structures located near potentially active faults. Observations of ground rupture patterns in alluvial materials following the 1992 Landers earthquake are presented. Particularly important are the observations of significant deformation away from the main trace, the width of the shear zone, and the effects of the surficial geology on the fault expression. Preliminary results from small-scale model tests simulating strike-slip rupture are also presented. The tests results confirm that the width of the shear zone depends primarily on the ductility and height of the soil deposit. These studies provide insight regarding ground deformation patterns in the soil overlying strike-slip faulting.