Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

4-2-1995

Session End Date

4-7-1995

Abstract

The traditional approach to scaling earthquake ground motion for geotechnical design applications is based on peak ground acceleration. This approach is useful when the physics of the problem depends linearly only on the nature of the high frequency (short wavelength) inertial part of strong motion. For nonlinear response analyses, the representative strain (~ velocity) and the number of stress reversals (~ duration of shaking) must also be considered. For long (large) structures (bridges and dams), the relative displacement of multiple foundations and the quasi-static deformation of the complete structure may contribute to the largest design levels. Thus, the modern design criteria must consider all the relevant scaling parameters and not just the high frequency inertial part of strong earthquake shaking. In this paper, the above points are illustrated via several examples.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Third Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-2-1995

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1995 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 2nd, 12:00 AM Apr 7th, 12:00 AM

Scaling Earthquake Motions in Geotechnical Design

St. Louis, Missouri

The traditional approach to scaling earthquake ground motion for geotechnical design applications is based on peak ground acceleration. This approach is useful when the physics of the problem depends linearly only on the nature of the high frequency (short wavelength) inertial part of strong motion. For nonlinear response analyses, the representative strain (~ velocity) and the number of stress reversals (~ duration of shaking) must also be considered. For long (large) structures (bridges and dams), the relative displacement of multiple foundations and the quasi-static deformation of the complete structure may contribute to the largest design levels. Thus, the modern design criteria must consider all the relevant scaling parameters and not just the high frequency inertial part of strong earthquake shaking. In this paper, the above points are illustrated via several examples.