Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

4-2-1995

Session End Date

4-7-1995

Abstract

A site specific risk zoning study was conducted on a Junior College Campus near Eureka, California, USA to evaluate the potential seismic/geologic hazards due to the presence of a 1 km wide low angle thrust fault system. Issues addressed to determine the level of risk at any location on the campus include: land sliding, earthquake ground shaking, ground surface rupture and deformation, lateral spreading, liquefaction, differential settlement, and tsunamis. Based on these potential hazards, a micro-zonation model was developed based on 13 different zones and 5 levels of risk. Information for use in this model was collected using a combination of paleo seismic trenches, geophysical surveys and soil borings. This information was then combined to develop a map of risk zones within the campus. This map provides site specific land use recommendations to assist the college in locating appropriate sites for future campus expansion.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Third Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-2-1995

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1995 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 2nd, 12:00 AM Apr 7th, 12:00 AM

Site Specific Seismic/Geologic Hazards Risk Zoning

St. Louis, Missouri

A site specific risk zoning study was conducted on a Junior College Campus near Eureka, California, USA to evaluate the potential seismic/geologic hazards due to the presence of a 1 km wide low angle thrust fault system. Issues addressed to determine the level of risk at any location on the campus include: land sliding, earthquake ground shaking, ground surface rupture and deformation, lateral spreading, liquefaction, differential settlement, and tsunamis. Based on these potential hazards, a micro-zonation model was developed based on 13 different zones and 5 levels of risk. Information for use in this model was collected using a combination of paleo seismic trenches, geophysical surveys and soil borings. This information was then combined to develop a map of risk zones within the campus. This map provides site specific land use recommendations to assist the college in locating appropriate sites for future campus expansion.