Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

4-2-1995

Session End Date

4-7-1995

Abstract

Possible use of short-period microtremors is explored for estimating the effects of subsurface soil conditions on the ground motion characteristics. For this purpose, microtremor measurements are conducted using arrays of sensors at two strong motion stations (Kushiro Japan Meteorological Agency and Kushiro Harbor, Hokkaido, Japan), which are located nearby but on different soils. Based on the F-k spectrum analysis of microtremors, dispersion curves of Rayleigh waves for the sites are determined. The inverse analysis of these dispersion curves results in shear wave velocity profiles down to a depth of 300 m. With these profiles, the spectrum ratio of ground surface motions between the two sites is computed, and compared with that of the observed records. The computed and observed spectrum ratios show a fairly good agreement, indicating that the array observation of microtremors is an economical and yet reliable means of estimating local site conditions.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Third Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-2-1995

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1995 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Estimation of Local Site Conditions in Kushiro City Based on Array Observation of Microtremors

St. Louis, Missouri

Possible use of short-period microtremors is explored for estimating the effects of subsurface soil conditions on the ground motion characteristics. For this purpose, microtremor measurements are conducted using arrays of sensors at two strong motion stations (Kushiro Japan Meteorological Agency and Kushiro Harbor, Hokkaido, Japan), which are located nearby but on different soils. Based on the F-k spectrum analysis of microtremors, dispersion curves of Rayleigh waves for the sites are determined. The inverse analysis of these dispersion curves results in shear wave velocity profiles down to a depth of 300 m. With these profiles, the spectrum ratio of ground surface motions between the two sites is computed, and compared with that of the observed records. The computed and observed spectrum ratios show a fairly good agreement, indicating that the array observation of microtremors is an economical and yet reliable means of estimating local site conditions.