Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

3-11-1991

Session End Date

3-15-1991

Abstract

The observations of liquefaction during the Cachar earthquake of N.E. India in December 31, 1984 (M=5.6) and the Great Nicobar earthquake of January 20, 1982 (M=6.3) have been reported. These observation, at short epicentral distances where duration of sustained motion was insufficient to postulate induced dynamic increase in pore water pressure, have been explained as quick-sand phenomena due to disturbance of soil structure under the influence of impulsive force associated with rupture at source. The proposed physical mechanism also explains well the bending of ceiling fan blades in Cachar earthquake and upthrow of objects during earthquakes in general. The discussion presented is expected to widen the scope of the explanation for ground failure, i.e., liquefaction in epicentral region particularly during moderate and shallow earthquake.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Second Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-11-1991

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1991 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Mar 11th, 12:00 AM Mar 15th, 12:00 AM

Liquefaction During Two Moderate-Recent Earthquakes in India

St. Louis, Missouri

The observations of liquefaction during the Cachar earthquake of N.E. India in December 31, 1984 (M=5.6) and the Great Nicobar earthquake of January 20, 1982 (M=6.3) have been reported. These observation, at short epicentral distances where duration of sustained motion was insufficient to postulate induced dynamic increase in pore water pressure, have been explained as quick-sand phenomena due to disturbance of soil structure under the influence of impulsive force associated with rupture at source. The proposed physical mechanism also explains well the bending of ceiling fan blades in Cachar earthquake and upthrow of objects during earthquakes in general. The discussion presented is expected to widen the scope of the explanation for ground failure, i.e., liquefaction in epicentral region particularly during moderate and shallow earthquake.