Location

St. Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

3-11-1991

Session End Date

3-15-1991

Abstract

A geotechnical investigation for the design and construction of an air-inflated rubber dam (for ground-water recharge) was performed, including evaluation of the liquefaction potential of the dam's foundation. The dam, about 300 feet long and 13 feet high when fully inflated is located along Alameda Creek at the upper part of the alluvial fan near Fremont, California. The sediments at the site are generally sandy gravels and gravelly sands. In order to fully investigate the liquefaction potential of the gravelly soils, the soils themselves were studied, and case histories involving similar conditions were reviewed. These case histories indicate that, in all cases where liquefaction appears to have occurred, the gravelly soils were loose to very loose and at shallow to moderate depths. For most of the reported cases the gravelly soils contained significant quantities of fines, and it was the fine matrix which actually liquefied. There are also numerous cases where earthquake induced liquefaction of gravelly soils (loose to dense) did not occur, but which are not given adequate coverage in the literature. The results of percolation tests, SPT blow count data, and comparison of particle-size distributions with gravelly soils that liquefied in past events all indicate that the soils at the rubber dam site have a very low probability of liquefaction.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conferences on Recent Advances in Geotechnical Earthquake Engineering and Soil Dynamics

Meeting Name

Second Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

3-11-1991

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1991 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Mar 11th, 12:00 AM Mar 15th, 12:00 AM

Liquefaction Analysis for Rubber Dam and Review of Case Histories of Liquefaction of Gravels

St. Louis, Missouri

A geotechnical investigation for the design and construction of an air-inflated rubber dam (for ground-water recharge) was performed, including evaluation of the liquefaction potential of the dam's foundation. The dam, about 300 feet long and 13 feet high when fully inflated is located along Alameda Creek at the upper part of the alluvial fan near Fremont, California. The sediments at the site are generally sandy gravels and gravelly sands. In order to fully investigate the liquefaction potential of the gravelly soils, the soils themselves were studied, and case histories involving similar conditions were reviewed. These case histories indicate that, in all cases where liquefaction appears to have occurred, the gravelly soils were loose to very loose and at shallow to moderate depths. For most of the reported cases the gravelly soils contained significant quantities of fines, and it was the fine matrix which actually liquefied. There are also numerous cases where earthquake induced liquefaction of gravelly soils (loose to dense) did not occur, but which are not given adequate coverage in the literature. The results of percolation tests, SPT blow count data, and comparison of particle-size distributions with gravelly soils that liquefied in past events all indicate that the soils at the rubber dam site have a very low probability of liquefaction.