Location

Rolla, MO

Session Start Date

6-11-1999

Session End Date

6-17-1999

Keywords and Phrases

Diesel Exhaust; Diesel Particulate Matter; Fuel Additive Properties; Catalytic Converter

Abstract

Diesel engines were introduced in European, Asian, and Australian coal mines nearly fifty years ago and more recently in U.S. coal mines. Their use minimizes the risks of mine fires and gas explosions associated with trolley wire haulage. While there is no epidemiological evidence that properly diluted diesel exhaust creates any health hazard, some concern persists about the long-term effects of inhaling diesel particulate matter. Existing control technology has been able to dilute all gaseous components of diesel exhaust to safe levels. Because there is no medically established threshold limit value for diesel particulate matter in U.S. coal mines, it was deemed appropriate to investigate the levels that can be achieved by adopting an integrated approach to diesel particulate matter control and using state-of-the-art technology. Technologically achievable control of diesel particulate matter concentrations in mine air can provide a basis for the use of diesel in mines until an in-mine standard based on scientific epidemiological studies can be derived.

Department(s)

Mining and Nuclear Engineering

Appears In

U.S. Mine Ventilation Symposium

Meeting Name

8th U.S. Mine Ventilation Symposium

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

6-11-1999

Document Version

Final Version

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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An Integrated Approach to Control Diesel Particulate Matter In Underground Coal Mines

Rolla, MO

Diesel engines were introduced in European, Asian, and Australian coal mines nearly fifty years ago and more recently in U.S. coal mines. Their use minimizes the risks of mine fires and gas explosions associated with trolley wire haulage. While there is no epidemiological evidence that properly diluted diesel exhaust creates any health hazard, some concern persists about the long-term effects of inhaling diesel particulate matter. Existing control technology has been able to dilute all gaseous components of diesel exhaust to safe levels. Because there is no medically established threshold limit value for diesel particulate matter in U.S. coal mines, it was deemed appropriate to investigate the levels that can be achieved by adopting an integrated approach to diesel particulate matter control and using state-of-the-art technology. Technologically achievable control of diesel particulate matter concentrations in mine air can provide a basis for the use of diesel in mines until an in-mine standard based on scientific epidemiological studies can be derived.