Masters Theses


"In this thesis, the application of a coaxial cable Fabry-Perot interferometer (CCFPI) as a high temperature sensor is analyzed. Coaxial cable sensors provide the advantages of fiber optic sensors, such as the ability to be embedded and multiplexed, while overcoming the limitations created by the fragility of fibers. The fabrication process of the CCFPI, using a computer controlled drill system to create holes in the cable is discussed. By analyzing the amplitudes of the created reflections, the diameter of the holes is optimized. A new fabrication process, in which holes are drilled 180⁰ apart from each other to create a single reflection, is discussed. The effect of cable shape on the built-in reflections is tested. This is achieved by measuring the TDR of the cable while the cable is in straight, circular, and "U" shaped patterns. An analysis of the built-in reflections at different frequencies is conducted. Through the process of subjecting the CCFPI sensor to multiple heating and cooling cycles, the low sensitivity of the sensor to temperature cycling is shown. The CCFPI sensor is shown to have the same temperature sensitivity while being heated as while cooling. The high temperature performance and survivability of the CCFPI is investigated. The CCFPI sensor demonstrates an operating range of 180⁰C to 650⁰C with a linear temperature sensitivity of -108 kHz/⁰C"--Abstract, page iii.


Xiao, Hai, Dr.

Committee Member(s)

Fan, Jun, 1971-
Hor, Yew San


Electrical and Computer Engineering

Degree Name

M.S. in Electrical Engineering


Missouri University of Science and Technology

Publication Date

Spring 2013


viii, 49 pages

Note about bibliography

Includes bibliographic references (pages 45-48).


© 2013 Kenneth Paul Smith, Jr., All rights reserved.

Document Type

Thesis - Restricted Access

File Type




Library of Congress Subject Headings

Fabry-Perot interferometers
Coaxial cables--Effect of temperature on

Thesis Number

T 10634

Electronic OCLC #


Link to Catalog Record

Electronic access to the full-text of this document is restricted to Missouri S&T users. Otherwise, request this publication directly from Missouri S&T Library or contact your local library.