Location

Saint Louis, Missouri

Session Start Date

10-20-1992

Abstract

Cellular roof and floor decks may be formed by attaching essentially flat sheets to a "hat-shapes" or to fluted profiles by spot welding along the contact lines. This leads to a closed cellular deck unit suitable for such purposes as in-floor power distribution or communication systems. In positive bending, or when the flat sheet is in tension and stable, cellular deck flexural properties can be determined following the American Iron and Steel Institute Cold Formed Steel Design Manual. When the flat sheet is in compression, its contribution is not described in the AISI Manual since it is not continuously connected to the cell top. In earlier AISI Manual Commentaries, an approximate method was suggested for evaluating flat sheets in compression. Basically, the sheet was treated as a "column" between welds and, if this "column" did not buckle at limiting panel flexural stresses, the element edge could be treated as if it were continuously supported. Existing effective width formulas could then be used. For the vast majority of cellular deck applications, welds are not so closely spaced and column-like buckling can occur. The purpose of this study has been to address cases with larger weld spacings and to propose a general method for finding the effective width of sheets in compression when used in cellular decks.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Research Center/Lab(s)

Wei-Wen Yu Center for Cold-Formed Steel Structures

Meeting Name

11th International Specialty Conference on Cold-Formed Steel Structures

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

10-20-1992

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1992 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Oct 20th, 12:00 AM

Properties for Cellular Decks in Negative Bending

Saint Louis, Missouri

Cellular roof and floor decks may be formed by attaching essentially flat sheets to a "hat-shapes" or to fluted profiles by spot welding along the contact lines. This leads to a closed cellular deck unit suitable for such purposes as in-floor power distribution or communication systems. In positive bending, or when the flat sheet is in tension and stable, cellular deck flexural properties can be determined following the American Iron and Steel Institute Cold Formed Steel Design Manual. When the flat sheet is in compression, its contribution is not described in the AISI Manual since it is not continuously connected to the cell top. In earlier AISI Manual Commentaries, an approximate method was suggested for evaluating flat sheets in compression. Basically, the sheet was treated as a "column" between welds and, if this "column" did not buckle at limiting panel flexural stresses, the element edge could be treated as if it were continuously supported. Existing effective width formulas could then be used. For the vast majority of cellular deck applications, welds are not so closely spaced and column-like buckling can occur. The purpose of this study has been to address cases with larger weld spacings and to propose a general method for finding the effective width of sheets in compression when used in cellular decks.