Location

Arlington, Virginia

Session Start Date

8-11-2008

Session End Date

8-16-2008

Abstract

An intense earthquake (MW = 6.4) occurred in western Iran, about 225 km west of Tehran at 7:28 local time, June 22, 2002. Surface soil in this area is mostly clay; however, clear traces of sand boiling, softening of soil, and consequent deformations were observed particularly in Hessar village. Some soil samples were prepared throughout an excavated pit from a depth of 2 m, the depth of the liquefied layer. The preliminary tests showed that the soil has a liquid limit of 38, a plasticity index of 18, and a < No. 200 fraction of 44%. These index characteristics would indicate a nonliquefiable soil according to the commonly used criteria. Analysis of cyclic triaxial test data suggests that the clayey sand deposit likely developed high residual excess pore pressures and significant shear strains during the earthquake and thus likely contributed to the observed lateral deformations. In this paper, different cases of observed liquefaction and consequent geotechnical phenomena are presented. Moreover, the results of laboratory tests on reconstituted samples are presented to prove how a soil with 44% of clay content could be liquefied.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Sixth Conference

Publisher

Missouri University of Science and Technology

Publication Date

8-11-2008

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2008 Missouri University of Science and Technology, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Investigation on the Liquefaction of a Clayey-Sandy Soil During Changureh Earthquake

Arlington, Virginia

An intense earthquake (MW = 6.4) occurred in western Iran, about 225 km west of Tehran at 7:28 local time, June 22, 2002. Surface soil in this area is mostly clay; however, clear traces of sand boiling, softening of soil, and consequent deformations were observed particularly in Hessar village. Some soil samples were prepared throughout an excavated pit from a depth of 2 m, the depth of the liquefied layer. The preliminary tests showed that the soil has a liquid limit of 38, a plasticity index of 18, and a < No. 200 fraction of 44%. These index characteristics would indicate a nonliquefiable soil according to the commonly used criteria. Analysis of cyclic triaxial test data suggests that the clayey sand deposit likely developed high residual excess pore pressures and significant shear strains during the earthquake and thus likely contributed to the observed lateral deformations. In this paper, different cases of observed liquefaction and consequent geotechnical phenomena are presented. Moreover, the results of laboratory tests on reconstituted samples are presented to prove how a soil with 44% of clay content could be liquefied.