Location

New York, New York

Session Start Date

4-13-2004

Session End Date

4-17-2004

Abstract

The source process of two normal-fault earthquakes, the 3 February 2002, M6.3 Afyon, Turkey and the 7 September 1999, M5.9 Athens, Greece earthquakes are studied using regional, teleseismic and strong motion data. Detailed information derived from teleseismic waveform modeling and source time functions inversions are combined and used to forward model recorded strong ground motion. Both events presented evidence for emergence of strong directivity effects during their rupture, which greatly affected the distribution of strong ground motion. These results are indicative of the contribution of the source factor to the distribution of earthquake damage and consequently of its importance in engineering practice in the proximity of large faults, especially within urban areas.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fifth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-13-2004

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2004 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

Share

 
COinS
 
Apr 13th, 12:00 AM Apr 17th, 12:00 AM

Source Process of Normal Earthquakes: the 3 February 2002, M6.3 Afyon, Turkey and the 7 September 1999, M5.9 Athens, Greece Earthquakes

New York, New York

The source process of two normal-fault earthquakes, the 3 February 2002, M6.3 Afyon, Turkey and the 7 September 1999, M5.9 Athens, Greece earthquakes are studied using regional, teleseismic and strong motion data. Detailed information derived from teleseismic waveform modeling and source time functions inversions are combined and used to forward model recorded strong ground motion. Both events presented evidence for emergence of strong directivity effects during their rupture, which greatly affected the distribution of strong ground motion. These results are indicative of the contribution of the source factor to the distribution of earthquake damage and consequently of its importance in engineering practice in the proximity of large faults, especially within urban areas.