Alternative Title

Site Effects on Structure Damage and Surface Ground Motion Characteristics in Tacna, Peru During June 23, 2001 Mw 8.4 Earthquake

Location

New York, New York

Session Start Date

4-13-2004

Session End Date

4-17-2004

Abstract

At a magnitude of Mw 8.4, the June 23, 2001 southern Peru earthquake was the largest earthquake to have occurred anywhere in the world in the last 36 years and the largest in the region in 133 years. Many researchers have postulated the theory of the effect local site conditions can have on surface ground motion and resulting building damage intensities. However, due to the relative infrequency of earthquake occurrences, a limited number of major earthquakes have been evaluated in detail to better quantify the effects of site conditions using case studies. This paper presents the case history of the June 23, 2001 southern Peru earthquake, focusing on evaluating the site effects and correlating building damage intensities to site soil conditions, taking into account construction practices. This paper presents a summary of comprehensive damage intensity survey and damage correlation based on identified soil types for the City of Tacna, located in southern Peru, 35 kilometers north of the Chilean border. The city has two zones with distinct soil profiles and it provides a good control of building types due to the relatively uniform construction practices of certain institutional buildings. A one-dimensional (1-D) seismic site response analysis was performed using the program SHAKE2000. The study shows that the damage intensity and surface ground motion characteristics as demonstrated in peak ground acceleration, predominant period, and spectral amplification are strongly affected by the local site conditions.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fifth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-13-2004

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2004 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Site Effects on Structure Damage and Surface Ground Motion Characteriscits in Tacna, Peru During June 23, 2001 Mw 8.4 Earthquake

New York, New York

At a magnitude of Mw 8.4, the June 23, 2001 southern Peru earthquake was the largest earthquake to have occurred anywhere in the world in the last 36 years and the largest in the region in 133 years. Many researchers have postulated the theory of the effect local site conditions can have on surface ground motion and resulting building damage intensities. However, due to the relative infrequency of earthquake occurrences, a limited number of major earthquakes have been evaluated in detail to better quantify the effects of site conditions using case studies. This paper presents the case history of the June 23, 2001 southern Peru earthquake, focusing on evaluating the site effects and correlating building damage intensities to site soil conditions, taking into account construction practices. This paper presents a summary of comprehensive damage intensity survey and damage correlation based on identified soil types for the City of Tacna, located in southern Peru, 35 kilometers north of the Chilean border. The city has two zones with distinct soil profiles and it provides a good control of building types due to the relatively uniform construction practices of certain institutional buildings. A one-dimensional (1-D) seismic site response analysis was performed using the program SHAKE2000. The study shows that the damage intensity and surface ground motion characteristics as demonstrated in peak ground acceleration, predominant period, and spectral amplification are strongly affected by the local site conditions.