Location

New York, New York

Session Start Date

4-13-2004

Session End Date

4-17-2004

Abstract

1999 Izmit earthquake has shown that a vast number of buildings were built over liquefiable silty soils in Adapazari, Turkey. Most of these buildings have been classified as “moderately” damaged, and mitigation of the liquefaction risk has been made mandatory before these structures are reoccupied. A literature review revealed that low pressure permeation grouting has been used successfully for this purpose. The effectiveness of this method is investigated in this study through geophysical measurements before and after the soil improvement at four different sites in downtown Adapazari . The results of this study indicate that the shear wave velocity of the improved soil is increased approximately twofold and the shear modulus of the improved soil is increased more than threefold. Improvements imparted to the soil are sufficient to reduce the liquefaction risk substantially. These findings are in line with the results reported in the literature. It appears that low permeation grouting is capable of reducing liquefaction risk under existing structures rapidly and at low cost.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fifth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-13-2004

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2004 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Reduction of Liquefaction Susceptibility Under Existing Structures by Permeation Grouting

New York, New York

1999 Izmit earthquake has shown that a vast number of buildings were built over liquefiable silty soils in Adapazari, Turkey. Most of these buildings have been classified as “moderately” damaged, and mitigation of the liquefaction risk has been made mandatory before these structures are reoccupied. A literature review revealed that low pressure permeation grouting has been used successfully for this purpose. The effectiveness of this method is investigated in this study through geophysical measurements before and after the soil improvement at four different sites in downtown Adapazari . The results of this study indicate that the shear wave velocity of the improved soil is increased approximately twofold and the shear modulus of the improved soil is increased more than threefold. Improvements imparted to the soil are sufficient to reduce the liquefaction risk substantially. These findings are in line with the results reported in the literature. It appears that low permeation grouting is capable of reducing liquefaction risk under existing structures rapidly and at low cost.