Location

New York, New York

Session Start Date

4-13-2004

Session End Date

4-17-2004

Abstract

The tailings of potash mining are piled up in huge heaps with heights of up to more than 200 m and a ground area of often more than a square km. The material behaviour of the salt is strongly visco-plastic, so that the slopes of the heaps are moving constantly at slow rates. As the strength of the salt is rate-dependent, structural analysis of the slope stability has to consider the deformations and deformation rates and the interaction of subsoil and slope. Due to the complex material behaviour the structural analysis is accompanied by an extensive measuring programme within the Observational Method. The paper focuses on two slopes of tailing heaps, where huge deformations partly at accelerating deformation rates occurred, due to natural respectively man-made slip-surfaces in the subsoil. The deformation rates were critically high and deformations induced serviceability problems to infrastructure at the base of the slope. It is shown, how the restoration of the endangered slopes and infrastructure was established. The concept of restoration is based on both intensive measuring and numerical simulations.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Fifth Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

4-13-2004

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 2004 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Apr 13th, 12:00 AM Apr 17th, 12:00 AM

Stability and Serviceability of Tailing Heaps With Visco-Plastic Materials

New York, New York

The tailings of potash mining are piled up in huge heaps with heights of up to more than 200 m and a ground area of often more than a square km. The material behaviour of the salt is strongly visco-plastic, so that the slopes of the heaps are moving constantly at slow rates. As the strength of the salt is rate-dependent, structural analysis of the slope stability has to consider the deformations and deformation rates and the interaction of subsoil and slope. Due to the complex material behaviour the structural analysis is accompanied by an extensive measuring programme within the Observational Method. The paper focuses on two slopes of tailing heaps, where huge deformations partly at accelerating deformation rates occurred, due to natural respectively man-made slip-surfaces in the subsoil. The deformation rates were critically high and deformations induced serviceability problems to infrastructure at the base of the slope. It is shown, how the restoration of the endangered slopes and infrastructure was established. The concept of restoration is based on both intensive measuring and numerical simulations.