Session Start Date

6-1-1988

Abstract

This paper relates to the conversion of a disused water reservoir into a landfill site for domestic and industrial refuse. The reservoir was initially subdivided into four cells (by using earth bunds) and three of the cells have been successfully prepared and filled. The fourth cell is the largest and presents the greatest number of geotechnical problems, the major one being the problem of ensuring that leachate does not escape into the groundwater. The first owner of the site removed natural clay from various parts of the reservoir base to seal the first three cells. In doing so he exposed water-bearing sandstones, mudstones and badly-shattered shales and ground water is now issuing freely from these strata. Standpipes in the base of the completed cells indicate a significant artesian pressure in the groundwater and sealing of the exposed rocks in cell 4 represents a major problem. In an attempt to form a low permeability seal with compacted clay temporary pressure relief drains have been installed to connect with the water bearing rocks. However closure of these drains may lead to excessive uplift pressure and rupture of the seal and so the relief drains will be left open, whilst waste is placed, until they can be safely closed.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

Second Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

6-1-1988

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1988 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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Jun 1st, 12:00 AM

Control of Uplift from Ground Water

This paper relates to the conversion of a disused water reservoir into a landfill site for domestic and industrial refuse. The reservoir was initially subdivided into four cells (by using earth bunds) and three of the cells have been successfully prepared and filled. The fourth cell is the largest and presents the greatest number of geotechnical problems, the major one being the problem of ensuring that leachate does not escape into the groundwater. The first owner of the site removed natural clay from various parts of the reservoir base to seal the first three cells. In doing so he exposed water-bearing sandstones, mudstones and badly-shattered shales and ground water is now issuing freely from these strata. Standpipes in the base of the completed cells indicate a significant artesian pressure in the groundwater and sealing of the exposed rocks in cell 4 represents a major problem. In an attempt to form a low permeability seal with compacted clay temporary pressure relief drains have been installed to connect with the water bearing rocks. However closure of these drains may lead to excessive uplift pressure and rupture of the seal and so the relief drains will be left open, whilst waste is placed, until they can be safely closed.