Session Start Date

5-6-1984

Abstract

The proposed expansion of ramps connecting Interstate Route 664 with Interstate Route 64 at Hampton, Virginia involved numerous high embankments and bridge structures over marshlands. Potential problems of embankment stability and excessive long term, post construction settlements were further complicated by very strict environmental constraints on acceptable construction methods. The solution chosen was stabilization of the in situ soils by the installation of stone columns. A description is given of stone column design, construction, field embankment instrumentation, and embankment performance for the first two years of operation. Four theories for predicting settlements of stone column reinforced ground are briefly reviewed. Calculated settlements of the embankment are then compared with the measured settlements. Although the settlements predicted by each method differ, they generally give good results.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

First Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

5-6-1984

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1984 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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May 6th, 12:00 AM

Performance of a Stone Column Supported Embankment

The proposed expansion of ramps connecting Interstate Route 664 with Interstate Route 64 at Hampton, Virginia involved numerous high embankments and bridge structures over marshlands. Potential problems of embankment stability and excessive long term, post construction settlements were further complicated by very strict environmental constraints on acceptable construction methods. The solution chosen was stabilization of the in situ soils by the installation of stone columns. A description is given of stone column design, construction, field embankment instrumentation, and embankment performance for the first two years of operation. Four theories for predicting settlements of stone column reinforced ground are briefly reviewed. Calculated settlements of the embankment are then compared with the measured settlements. Although the settlements predicted by each method differ, they generally give good results.