Session Start Date

5-6-1984

Abstract

An 18-story reinforced concrete building under construction in South Florida reached 16th floor level when significant differential settlement presented an unanticipated foundation problem. The foundation consisted of a structural mat supported by 14-in. concrete piles 24 to 75 ft long. Surprisingly, the longest piles were within the area of greatest settlement. Investigation revealed a previously undisclosed semi-cavernous zone from 120 to 175 ft below ground surface, and level surveys using deep benchmarks confirmed that zone to be the source of movement. Injection grouting first accelerated and then controlled the settlement, allowing the building to be completed on schedule. Temperature probes and weekly precise level surveys were key control devices contributing to the correction of the problem.

Department(s)

Civil, Architectural and Environmental Engineering

Appears In

International Conference on Case Histories in Geotechnical Engineering

Meeting Name

First Conference

Publisher

University of Missouri--Rolla

Publication Date

5-6-1984

Document Version

Final Version

Rights

© 1984 University of Missouri--Rolla, All rights reserved.

Document Type

Article - Conference proceedings

File Type

text

Language

English

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May 6th, 12:00 AM

Grouting to Control Deep Foundation Settlement

An 18-story reinforced concrete building under construction in South Florida reached 16th floor level when significant differential settlement presented an unanticipated foundation problem. The foundation consisted of a structural mat supported by 14-in. concrete piles 24 to 75 ft long. Surprisingly, the longest piles were within the area of greatest settlement. Investigation revealed a previously undisclosed semi-cavernous zone from 120 to 175 ft below ground surface, and level surveys using deep benchmarks confirmed that zone to be the source of movement. Injection grouting first accelerated and then controlled the settlement, allowing the building to be completed on schedule. Temperature probes and weekly precise level surveys were key control devices contributing to the correction of the problem.