Title

Traumatic Brain Injury Diagnosis Via HPLC-MS/MS

Presenter Information

Alexandre Cristea

Department

Chemistry

Major

Biochemistry

Research Advisor

Shi, Honglan

Advisor's Department

Chemistry

Funding Source

OURE Fellows Program, Leanard Wood Institute

Abstract

Over 2.5 million cases of traumatic brain injury (TBI) are reported each year in the United States and are involved in 30% of all injury-related deaths. TBl's can occur in a variety of ways and are thus difficult to diagnose. Current methods either include extensive imaging using expensive equipment or simple qualitative assessments that analyze a patient's verbal and motor skill. Due to the lack of an efficient method of TBI characterization, a metabolomics approach will be taken in order to design a biomarker profile for the complex injury. By utilizing high-performance liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectroscopy (HPLC - MS/MS), a quantitative method was designed to analyze the concentrations of eight compounds in urine that have been previously linked with traumatic brain injury. This method was then used to analyze the urine of students, to prove method efficacy in real urine samples and establish the average concentrations of these metabolites in urine.

Biography

Alex is a senior chemistry student and has been conducting research in the chemistry department since his freshman year. Throughout his time at S& T, he has been an active member of the chemistry department and has been involved in numerous projects across several disciplines of chemistry. Alex will graduate this May and is currently seeking work in analytical chemistry in St. Louis.

Presentation Type

OURE Fellows Final Oral Presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Location

Missouri Room

Presentation Date

16 Apr 2019, 9:30 am - 10:00 am

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Apr 16th, 9:30 AM Apr 16th, 10:00 AM

Traumatic Brain Injury Diagnosis Via HPLC-MS/MS

Missouri Room

Over 2.5 million cases of traumatic brain injury (TBI) are reported each year in the United States and are involved in 30% of all injury-related deaths. TBl's can occur in a variety of ways and are thus difficult to diagnose. Current methods either include extensive imaging using expensive equipment or simple qualitative assessments that analyze a patient's verbal and motor skill. Due to the lack of an efficient method of TBI characterization, a metabolomics approach will be taken in order to design a biomarker profile for the complex injury. By utilizing high-performance liquid chromatography - tandem mass spectroscopy (HPLC - MS/MS), a quantitative method was designed to analyze the concentrations of eight compounds in urine that have been previously linked with traumatic brain injury. This method was then used to analyze the urine of students, to prove method efficacy in real urine samples and establish the average concentrations of these metabolites in urine.