Title

Parameter Estimation in a One-Dimensional Transient Convection Model of a Slender Cylindrical Fin with a Time-Dependent Boundary Temperature

Presenter Information

Lauren Tomanek

Department

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Major

Mechanical Engineering; Math Minor

Research Advisor

Stutts, Daniel S.

Advisor's Department

Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering

Funding Source

Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering for ME4842 Lab

Abstract

This study describes one of the few transient convection models having a closed-form solution: that for a slender cylindrical metal rod (fin) with specified time-dependent boundary temperature on one boundary, and adiabatic on the other. The convection coefficient and thermal conductivity can be estimated using a modified Levenberg-Marquardt nonlinear least squares algorithm to minimize the difference between the model and experimentally measured temperatures under forced convection. Reasonable values for the convection coefficient were obtained, and the estimated thermal conduction coefficient compared well with published values for the rod materials used.

Biography

Lauren Tomanek is a first semester Ph.D. student working with Dr. Daniel Stutts. She graduated with her bachelor’s in Mechanical Engineering in December 2017 from Missouri S&T and is now a graduate teaching assistant for the ME 4842 class.

Research Category

Engineering

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Location

Carver Room

Presentation Date

17 Apr 2018, 11:00 am - 11:30 am

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Apr 17th, 11:00 AM Apr 17th, 11:30 AM

Parameter Estimation in a One-Dimensional Transient Convection Model of a Slender Cylindrical Fin with a Time-Dependent Boundary Temperature

Carver Room

This study describes one of the few transient convection models having a closed-form solution: that for a slender cylindrical metal rod (fin) with specified time-dependent boundary temperature on one boundary, and adiabatic on the other. The convection coefficient and thermal conductivity can be estimated using a modified Levenberg-Marquardt nonlinear least squares algorithm to minimize the difference between the model and experimentally measured temperatures under forced convection. Reasonable values for the convection coefficient were obtained, and the estimated thermal conduction coefficient compared well with published values for the rod materials used.