Title

The Impact of Monetary Gains and Losses on Cybersecurity Behavior

Presenter Information

Cooper Broman

Department

Business and Information Technology

Major

Information Science and Technology

Research Advisor

Nah, Fiona Fui-Hoon, 1966-

Advisor's Department

Business and Information Technology

Abstract

This research examines users’ computer security risk-taking behavior when presented with the possibility of monetary value gains and losses for their action. Since personal finance is easy to identify with, we believe that this research will help to increase our understanding on the risk-taking behavior of users in an information security context. While technology may provide protection from harmful programs or viruses on a device, how a user interacts with the system, such as disabling a firewall, may open ‘holes’ in the system that could ultimately cause harm to the device or risk the privacy of the user. The specific research question is: “Are users more willing to take greater risks in a cybersecurity context when gains and losses of monetary value for their risky behavior are involved?”

Biography

Cooper Broman is a freshman majoring in Information Science and Technology from Festus, Missouri. He works as an assistant lab manager for the Laboratory for Information Technology Evaluation (LITE). In addition, he is a member of the Future Business Leaders of America (FBLA) and the Missouri S&T Paintball team. His interests include sports such as running and biking, and other forms of physical activity.

Research Category

Social Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Award

Social science poster session, Third place

Location

Upper Atrium

Presentation Date

17 Apr 2018, 9:00 am - 12:00 pm

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Apr 17th, 9:00 AM Apr 17th, 12:00 PM

The Impact of Monetary Gains and Losses on Cybersecurity Behavior

Upper Atrium

This research examines users’ computer security risk-taking behavior when presented with the possibility of monetary value gains and losses for their action. Since personal finance is easy to identify with, we believe that this research will help to increase our understanding on the risk-taking behavior of users in an information security context. While technology may provide protection from harmful programs or viruses on a device, how a user interacts with the system, such as disabling a firewall, may open ‘holes’ in the system that could ultimately cause harm to the device or risk the privacy of the user. The specific research question is: “Are users more willing to take greater risks in a cybersecurity context when gains and losses of monetary value for their risky behavior are involved?”