Title

MOF-74 and UTSA-16 Film Growth on 3D-printed Monolithic Structures for CO₂ Capture

Presenter Information

Connor Griffin

Department

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Major

Chemical Engineering

Research Advisor

Rownaghi, Ali

Advisor's Department

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Funding Source

OURE Program

Abstract

My project was developing an inorganic structure into a greenhouse gas adsorbent. I started by 3D printing a monolith made up of primarily Kaolin. Once printed and calcinated, the monoliths were functionalized in an ammonia hydroxide solution. The monoliths were allowed to dry before the immobilization process. This process was a three-step technique. The monoliths were dipped in Torlon, transferred to a NiMOF-74 slurry, and allowed to dry. Three times this process was repeated before a trip to the vacuum oven. Tests then could be performed for adsorption capacity, BET surface area, and XRD peak consistency. Analysis verified this technique effective in adsorbent development.

Biography

Connor is a Junior in Chemical Engineering and pursuing minors in Chemistry and Engineering Management. This is Connor’s third semester working in the lab on greenhouse gas capture. Outside of research, he is involved with Miner Rugby and mentoring at the local grade schools. Connor enjoys being outside, fishing, or playing sports in his free time.

Research Category

Engineering

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Award

Engineering oral presentation, Third place

Location

Carver Room

Presentation Date

17 Apr 2018, 9:30 am - 10:00 am

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Apr 17th, 9:30 AM Apr 17th, 10:00 AM

MOF-74 and UTSA-16 Film Growth on 3D-printed Monolithic Structures for CO₂ Capture

Carver Room

My project was developing an inorganic structure into a greenhouse gas adsorbent. I started by 3D printing a monolith made up of primarily Kaolin. Once printed and calcinated, the monoliths were functionalized in an ammonia hydroxide solution. The monoliths were allowed to dry before the immobilization process. This process was a three-step technique. The monoliths were dipped in Torlon, transferred to a NiMOF-74 slurry, and allowed to dry. Three times this process was repeated before a trip to the vacuum oven. Tests then could be performed for adsorption capacity, BET surface area, and XRD peak consistency. Analysis verified this technique effective in adsorbent development.