Title

The Russian Revolution: A 100 years of Historiography

Presenter Information

Donald Morard

Department

History and Political Science

Major

History

Research Advisor

Fogg, Shannon Lee

Advisor's Department

History and Political Science

Abstract

2017 marked the centennial of the February and October Revolutions, stirring up conversations about what happened in Russia during the revolution and why it happened. This paper evaluates the100 years of Russian Revolution historiography and the changes which took place over the years. The historiography of the revolution until the end of the Cold War was often defined by political bias and a focus on the political leadership of the various factions by both the Western point of view and the Soviet/socialist perspective. After the Soviet Union fell a new modern historiography emerged which drew from both traditional schools and focused on groups such as women and ethnic minorities. In this research traditional sources like books and journal articles are used along with propaganda posters and newspapers. Sources range from the early 1920’s to 2017.

Biography

Donald Morard is a junior in the Missouri S&T History and Political Science department pursuing a Bachelor of Arts in History. His research primarily focuses on 19th and 20th century Baltic and Eastern Europe.

Research Category

Arts and Humanities

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Award

Arts and humanities oral presentation, First place

Location

Carver Room

Presentation Date

17 Apr 2018, 1:00 pm - 1:30 pm

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Apr 17th, 1:00 PM Apr 17th, 1:30 PM

The Russian Revolution: A 100 years of Historiography

Carver Room

2017 marked the centennial of the February and October Revolutions, stirring up conversations about what happened in Russia during the revolution and why it happened. This paper evaluates the100 years of Russian Revolution historiography and the changes which took place over the years. The historiography of the revolution until the end of the Cold War was often defined by political bias and a focus on the political leadership of the various factions by both the Western point of view and the Soviet/socialist perspective. After the Soviet Union fell a new modern historiography emerged which drew from both traditional schools and focused on groups such as women and ethnic minorities. In this research traditional sources like books and journal articles are used along with propaganda posters and newspapers. Sources range from the early 1920’s to 2017.