Title

Nonequilibrium phase transitions in a model of ecological and evolutionary dynamics

Presenter Information

Skye Tackett

Department

Physics

Major

Physics

Research Advisor

Vojta, Thomas

Advisor's Department

Physics

Funding Source

This work was partially supported by the NSF under Grant Nos. DMR-1205803 and DMR-1506152.

Abstract

We employ large-scale Monte-Carlo simulations to study the extinction transition in a model describing the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of biopopulations. In the case of a neutral, time-independent fitness landscape, the extinction transition falls into the well-known directed percolation universality class. Temporal disorder (representing, for example, climate fluctuations) drastically changes the transition and leads to an exotic infinite-noise critical point. It is characterized by anomalously large fluctuations of the population size and logarithmically slow dynamics.

Biography

Skye Tackkett is an undergraduate junior majoring in Physics and minoring in Mathematics and German. Currently, they are a member of the Gaffers Guild and the president of the Society of Physics Students. After earning their bachelor’s, they intend to obtain a PhD in Materials Science with a research focus on nanostructured material applications and following that, they would like to become a professor and continue researching nanomaterials.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hall

Start Date

4-11-2017 9:00 AM

End Date

4-11-2017 11:45 AM

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Apr 11th, 9:00 AM Apr 11th, 11:45 AM

Nonequilibrium phase transitions in a model of ecological and evolutionary dynamics

Upper Atrium/Hall

We employ large-scale Monte-Carlo simulations to study the extinction transition in a model describing the ecological and evolutionary dynamics of biopopulations. In the case of a neutral, time-independent fitness landscape, the extinction transition falls into the well-known directed percolation universality class. Temporal disorder (representing, for example, climate fluctuations) drastically changes the transition and leads to an exotic infinite-noise critical point. It is characterized by anomalously large fluctuations of the population size and logarithmically slow dynamics.