Title

Bifunctionalization of nanoparticles with DNA and PEG polymers

Presenter Information

Isabella Bowling

Department

Chemistry

Major

Biological Sciences

Research Advisor

Wang, Risheng

Advisor's Department

Chemistry

Funding Source

Department of Chemistry; OURE

Abstract

This research entails the findings observed while testing the binding efficiency of different ratios of bifunctionalized gold nanoparticles. A polymer, polyethylene glycol (PEG), was utilized to promote interactions between DNA origami rectangles and the gold nanoparticles. Binding yields were calculated by annealing samples with the varying ratios and analyzing them. The ratios with lower consumption of DNA provides a scaling-up potential for the application of DNA-nanoparticle conjugates in nanotechnology.

Biography

Isabella Bowling is a junior studying Biological Sciences. She is involved on campus through research under Dr. Wang, the iGEM design team, and as a Senior Resident Assistant in University Commons. After graduation, she plans to attend a graduate program for Genetic Counseling.

Research Category

Sciences

Presentation Type

Poster Presentation

Document Type

Poster

Location

Upper Atrium/Hall

Start Date

4-11-2017 9:00 AM

End Date

4-11-2017 11:45 AM

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Apr 11th, 9:00 AM Apr 11th, 11:45 AM

Bifunctionalization of nanoparticles with DNA and PEG polymers

Upper Atrium/Hall

This research entails the findings observed while testing the binding efficiency of different ratios of bifunctionalized gold nanoparticles. A polymer, polyethylene glycol (PEG), was utilized to promote interactions between DNA origami rectangles and the gold nanoparticles. Binding yields were calculated by annealing samples with the varying ratios and analyzing them. The ratios with lower consumption of DNA provides a scaling-up potential for the application of DNA-nanoparticle conjugates in nanotechnology.