Title

The Separation of Ethane and Ethylene via Adsorbent Materials

Presenter Information

Morgan Hovis

Department

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Major

Chemical Engineering

Research Advisor

Rezaei, Fateme

Advisor's Department

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Funding Source

Opportunities for Undergraduate Research Experiences (OURE)

Abstract

Light olefins, such as ethylene and propylene, are important building blocks involved in many industrial processes, namely in the plastic and rubber industries. The process of producing pure olefins is complex and energy intensive because these olefin/paraffin pairs, such as ethane and ethylene, have similar physical properties. Studies have been performed to develop a more cost-effective olefin/paraffin separation processes. One alternative to separate these pairs is by using adsorbents. Adsorbents are porous materials and when a mixture of gasses is ran through these materials, one gas will continue to pass through the adsorbent, while the other gets trapped inside. Studying this method could lead to future implications of adsorbent separation in industry.

Biography

Morgan Hovis is a Junior studying Chemical Engineering. She is from Fredericktown, Missouri. Her student organizations include Kappa Delta Sorority, Phi Sigma Pi National Honor Fraternity, and Missouri S&T Ballet and Dance Club. She is looking forward to her internship with Missouri Department of Natural Resources in the summer.

Presentation Type

OURE Fellows Proposal Oral Applicant

Document Type

Presentation

Award

2016-2017 OURE Fellows recipient

Location

Turner Room

Presentation Date

11 Apr 2016, 2:40 pm - 3:00 pm

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Apr 11th, 2:40 PM Apr 11th, 3:00 PM

The Separation of Ethane and Ethylene via Adsorbent Materials

Turner Room

Light olefins, such as ethylene and propylene, are important building blocks involved in many industrial processes, namely in the plastic and rubber industries. The process of producing pure olefins is complex and energy intensive because these olefin/paraffin pairs, such as ethane and ethylene, have similar physical properties. Studies have been performed to develop a more cost-effective olefin/paraffin separation processes. One alternative to separate these pairs is by using adsorbents. Adsorbents are porous materials and when a mixture of gasses is ran through these materials, one gas will continue to pass through the adsorbent, while the other gets trapped inside. Studying this method could lead to future implications of adsorbent separation in industry.