Title

Nanoparticle Shape Synergistically Inhibits Cancer

Presenter Information

Caitlin Brocker

Department

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Major

Chemical Engineering

Research Advisor

Barua, Sutapa

Advisor's Department

Chemical and Biochemical Engineering

Funding Source

PI’s Start-Up

Abstract

Interactions of nanoparticles with human cells have been the subject of intense research in the field of bioengineering due to their potential applications in imaging, gene delivery, drug delivery, and targeted cancer treatment. Nanoparticles, when modified with ligands, recognize specific cell membranes through binding with their complementray receptor proteins, and are internalized by cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis process. However, the ability of ligands-laden nanoparticles to target cells also depends on physical properties such as shape, among others. In spite of its high relevance, it is not known how the shape of nanoparticles can be engineered to enhance targeting abilities of nanoparticles. The objectives of this project are (i) generation of nanoparticles of various shapes (sphere, rod and disk); (ii) modification of nanoparticle surface with a US FDA-approved antibody, Herceptin for interacting with HER-2 proteins on breast cancer cells; and (iii) evaluation of therapeutic activity of drugs using the optimum shape.

Biography

Caitlin Brocker is a junior and plans to complete her B.S. in Chemical Engineering with a Biochemical Emphasis at Missouri University of Science and Technology in May of 2017. Caitlin is also on the Missouri S&T Women’s Volleyball Team and the Love Your Melon Campus Crew. She has been working in Dr. Sutapa Barua’s lab since April 2015, and her projects have involved drug delivery systems for breast cancer treatment.

Research Category

Engineering

Presentation Type

Oral Presentation

Document Type

Presentation

Location

Turner Room

Presentation Date

11 Apr 2016, 9:40 am - 10:00 am

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Apr 11th, 9:40 AM Apr 11th, 10:00 AM

Nanoparticle Shape Synergistically Inhibits Cancer

Turner Room

Interactions of nanoparticles with human cells have been the subject of intense research in the field of bioengineering due to their potential applications in imaging, gene delivery, drug delivery, and targeted cancer treatment. Nanoparticles, when modified with ligands, recognize specific cell membranes through binding with their complementray receptor proteins, and are internalized by cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis process. However, the ability of ligands-laden nanoparticles to target cells also depends on physical properties such as shape, among others. In spite of its high relevance, it is not known how the shape of nanoparticles can be engineered to enhance targeting abilities of nanoparticles. The objectives of this project are (i) generation of nanoparticles of various shapes (sphere, rod and disk); (ii) modification of nanoparticle surface with a US FDA-approved antibody, Herceptin for interacting with HER-2 proteins on breast cancer cells; and (iii) evaluation of therapeutic activity of drugs using the optimum shape.